Islam, Politics, and Social Movements

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Edmund Burke, Ervand Abrahamian, Ira Marvin Lapidus
University of California Press, 1988 - History - 332 pages
2 Reviews
Taken together the essays in this work not only provide new research essential to the study of Islamic societies and Muslim peoples, but also set a new standard for the concrete study of local situations and illuminate the forces shaping the history of modern Muslim societies.

This collection is unique in its sophisticated interpretation of the social protest and political resistance movements in Muslim countries during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The contributors take two principal approaches to the study of their subject. Utilizing "new cultural history," they explore how particular movements have deployed the cultural and religious resources of Islam to mobilize and legitimize insurgent political action. Others rely on "new social history" to study the economic, political, and social contexts in which movements of anti-colonial resistance and revolution have developed. This work brings together contributions from specialists on Islamic North Africa, Egypt, the Arab fertile crescent, Iran and India.
  

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Abrahamian in a few pages describes, denote and debunks Ali Shariat'i in the most beautifully written language.

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afghani fossilized

Contents

Patterns of Historical Change
3
Methodological Reflections
17
PART TWO NINETEENTHCENTURY ANTICOLONIAL
37
North Africa
60
Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
81
Personal Practice
115
A Prelude to Pakistan
146
The Role of the Palestinian Peasantry in the Great Revolt 19361939
169
Muslim Brothers
207
Two Cases
228
Paul Lubeck j
244
The PreRevolutionary Years
263
Ervand Abrahamian
289
Iranian Revolutions in Comparative Perspective
298
LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
315
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Edmund Burke III is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Ira M. Lapidus is Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley.

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