Scenes from the Bathhouse: And Other Stories of Communist Russia

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University of Michigan Press, Jan 1, 1961 - Fiction - 245 pages
3 Reviews
Uproariously funny stories that give a behind-the-scenes look at daily life in the Soviet Union of Zoshchenko's time
  

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Review: Scenes from the Bathhouse: And Other Stories of Communist Russia

User Review  - Josh - Goodreads

what is one to say regarding the brainless and pornographic scribblings of this literary vagrant?? Read full review

Review: Scenes from the Bathhouse: And Other Stories of Communist Russia

User Review  - Vincent Saint-Simon - Goodreads

Sirs and Madams, In my top five favorite books of all time. CC, V Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
12
III
15
IV
17
V
20
VI
23
VII
26
VIII
29
XXI
88
XXII
93
XXIII
101
XXIV
105
XXV
109
XXVI
118
XXVII
139
XXVIII
146

IX
32
X
35
XI
37
XII
40
XIII
42
XIV
45
XV
47
XVI
49
XVII
52
XVIII
74
XIX
78
XX
82
XXIX
149
XXX
153
XXXI
158
XXXII
162
XXXIII
166
XXXIV
169
XXXV
173
XXXVI
177
XXXVII
184
XXXVIII
190
XXXIX
199
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About the author (1961)

His first book of stories appeared in 1921 and became extraordinarily popular. However, he came under political pressure in the 1930s because some of his works, such as Youth Restored (1933), were too slyly ambiguous to fit the socialist realist model. In 1946, together with Akhmatova, he was singled out for an extraordinary attack by culture "boss" Andrei Zhdanov and was expelled from the Union of Soviet Writers. From then on he mostly produced translations. Zoshchenko was an extremely effective satirist who took his subjects from the paradoxes and incongruities of post-Revolutionary Russian society. He showed that human nature, which the new government was trying to change, would assert itself nonetheless. His language is fascinating. He often chooses lower-class narrators who speak in a mixture of the colloquial and of the new Soviet rhetoric---with highly comic results. During the 1930s, Zoshchenko's fiction began to explore philosophical and theoretical problems. A well-known example is Before Sunrise, the first part of which was published in 1943. In it the author analyzes his own psyche, in the process touching on the then-forbidden theories of Freud. Publication of the complete text of this work did not occur until 1972.

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