Children of the Frost

Front Cover
1st World Library, Feb 20, 2007 - 174 pages
8 Reviews
A weary journey beyond the last scrub timber and straggling copses, into the heart of the Barrens where the niggard North is supposed to deny the Earth, are to be found great sweeps of forests and stretches of smiling land. But this the world is just beginning to know. The world's explorers have known it, from time to time, but hitherto they have never returned to tell the world. The Barrens-well, they are the Barrens, the bad lands of the Arctic, the deserts of the Circle, the bleak and bitter home of the musk-ox and the lean plains wolf. So Avery Van Brunt found them, treeless and cheerless, sparsely clothed with moss and lichens, and altogether uninviting. At least so he found them till he penetrated to the white blank spaces on the map, and came upon undreamed-of rich spruce forests and unrecorded Eskimo tribes. It had been his intention, (and his bid for fame), to break up these white blank spaces and diversify them with the black markings of mountain-chains, sinks and basins, and sinuous river courses; and it was with added delight that he came to speculate upon the possibilities of timber belts and native villages.

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Review: Children of the Frost

User Review  - Conrad Toft - Goodreads

Jack London manages to capture both the lives of the natives and the newcomers without seeming to judge each except through the eyes of the others. Through this collection of short stories he tells of ... Read full review

Review: Children of the Frost

User Review  - Lex - Goodreads

I don't really know why I read Jack London's Children of the Frost.. the writting was at times chilling, and other times very odd juxtaposed with my earlier impressions of Inuit.. it certainly left a strong impression. Read full review

About the author (2007)

Jack London (1876-1916) was an American writer who produced two hundred short stories, more than four hundred nonfiction pieces, twenty novels, and three full-length plays in less than two decades. His best-known works include The Call of the Wild, The Sea Wolf, and White Fang.

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