A Practical Treatise on Arithmetic: Wherein Every Principle Taught is Explained in a Simple and Obvious Manner; Containing Numerous Questions, and Combining the Useful Properties of Former Works, with the Modern Improvements. Being a Complete System. To which is Added, a Description of Book-keeping, with Examples for Practice (Google eBook)

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G.W. Light, 1839 - Arithmetic - 347 pages
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Page 9 - Cardinal numbers: 1 one 2 two 3 three 4 four 5 five 6 six 7 seven 8 eight 9 nine 10 ten 11 eleven 12 twelve 13 thirteen 14 fourteen 15 fifteen 16 sixteen 17 seventeen 18 eighteen 19 nineteen 20...
Page 256 - These are usually accounted six in number, viz. the Lever, the Wheel and Axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw.
Page 11 - ... one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen eighteen nineteen twenty thirty forty fifty sixty seventy eighty ninety one hundred two hundred three hundred four hundred five hundred...
Page 337 - Thirty days after sight of this first of exchange (second and third of the same tenor and date unpaid...
Page 268 - There are five things in arithmetical progression, any three of which being given, the other two may be found : — 1st. The first term. ' 2d. The last term. 3d. The number of terms. 4th. The common difference. 5th. The sum of al!
Page 233 - That number, which multiplied by itself will produce a certain other number, is called the square root of this other number ; thus, 2 is the square root of 4, 5 the square root of 25, &c.
Page 70 - To reduce a mixed number to an improper fraction. Multiply the whole number by the denominator of the fraction, and to the product add the given numerator.
Page 218 - The area of a triangle is equal to half the product of its base by its altitude.
Page 165 - Compute the interest to the time of the first payment ; if that be one year or more from the time the interest commenced , add it to the principal, and deduct the payment from the sum total. If there be after payments made, compute the interest on the balance due, to the next payment, and then deduct the payment as above ; and in like manner from one payment to another till all the payments are absorbed ; provided the time between one payment and another be one year or more.
Page 9 - ... sixty-seven 68 sixty-eight 69 sixty-nine 70 seventy 71 seventy-one 72 seventy-two 73 seventy-three 74 seventy-four 75 seventy-five 76 seventy-six 77 seventy-seven 78 seventy-eight 79 seventy-nine 80 eighty 81 eighty-one 82 eighty-two 83 eighty-three 84 eighty-four 85...

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