The Song of Hiawatha (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin, 1908 - Ojibwa Indians - 242 pages
18 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
7
4 stars
6
3 stars
4
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: The Song of Hiawatha

User Review  - Theresa - Goodreads

I'm not sure how to even say what I think. First and foremost every time I was reading it, I wanted to read it out loud. It was so beautiful. It seemed a shame to have its sound stifled. Second, I ... Read full review

Review: The Song of Hiawatha

User Review  - Masterrabbi - Goodreads

Listened to a reading by William Hootkins. Longfellow not only translates into English and records the tales of Manabozho of the Ojibwe, but brings them into verse in a melded American story. The ... Read full review

All 5 reviews »

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 95 - As unto the bow the cord is, So unto the man is woman, Though she bends him, she obeys him, Though she draws him, yet she follows, Useless each without the other...
Page 69 - Take them all, O Hiawatha!" From the earth he tore the fibres, Tore the tough roots of the Larch-Tree, Closely sewed the bark together, Bound it closely to the framework.
Page 28 - By the shores of Gitche Gumee, By the shining Big-Sea-Water, Stood the wigwam of Nokomis, Daughter of the Moon, Nokomis. Dark behind it rose the forest, Rose the black and gloomy pine-trees, THE SONG OF HIAWATHA Rose the firs with cones upon them ; Bright before it beat the water, Beat the clear and sunny water, Beat the shining Big-Sea-Water.
Page 191 - NEVER stoops the soaring vulture On his quarry in the desert, On the sick or wounded bison, But another vulture, watching From his high aerial look-out, Sees the downward plunge, and follows ; And a third pursues the second, Coming from the invisible ether, First a speck, and then a vulture, Till the air is dark with pinions.
Page 70 - Thus the Birch Canoe was builded In the valley, by the river, In the bosom of the forest ; And the forest's life was in it, All its mystery and its magic, All the lightness of the birch-tree, All the toughness of the cedar, All the larch's supple sinews ; And it floated on the river Like a yellow leaf in Autumn, Like a yellow water-lily.
Page 4 - ON the Mountains of the Prairie, On the great Red Pipe-stone Quarry, Gitche Manito, the mighty, He the Master of Life, descending, On the red crags of the quarry Stood erect, and called the nations, Called the tribes of men together.
Page 100 - ... another tribe and country, Young and tall and very handsome, Who one morning, in the Spring-time, Came to buy her father's arrows, Sat and rested in the wigwam, Lingered long about the doorway, Looking back as he departed. She had heard her father praise him, Praise his courage and his wisdom ; 99 100 Would he come again for arrows To the Falls of Minnehaha? On the mat her hands lay idle, And her eyes were very dreamy.
Page 9 - Came the Mandans and Dacotahs, Came the Hurons and Ojibways, All the warriors drawn together By the signal of the Peace-Pipe, To the Mountains of the Prairie, To the great Red Pipe-stone Quarry. And they stood there on the meadow, With their weapons and their war gear, Painted like the leaves of Autumn, Painted like the sky of morning...
Page 33 - There he waited till the deer came, Till he saw two antlers lifted, Saw two eyes look from the thicket, Saw two nostrils point to windward, And a deer came down the pathway, Flecked with leafy light and shadow.
Page 152 - He is dead, the sweet musician! He the sweetest of all singers! He has gone from us forever, He has moved a little nearer To the Master of all music, To the Master of all singing!

Bibliographic information