A History of Presbyterianism in New England: Its Introduction, Growth, Decay, Revival and Present Mission (Google eBook)

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author, 1881 - New England - 512 pages
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OCLC: 25451127
Related Subjects: Presbyterian Church -- New England -- History.
LCCN:BX

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Page 478 - Virginia, do, by these presents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation, and furtherance of the ends aforesaid ; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony ; unto which we promise all due...
Page 42 - ... an overruling Providence, they habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute. To know him, to serve him, to enjoy him, was with them the great end of existence. They rejected with contempt the ceremonious homage which other sects substituted for the pure worship of the soul. Instead of catching occasional glimpses of the Deity through an obscuring veil, they aspired to gaze full on the intolerable...
Page 300 - Now I beseech you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that ye all speak the same thing, and that there be no divisions among you; but that ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment.
Page 478 - Faith &c. having undertaken for the glory of God and advancement of the Christian faith, and honor of our King and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the Northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God, and of one another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic...
Page 71 - Presents, hath given, granted, bargained, sold, aliened, enfeoffed, released, conveyed and confirmed, and by these Presents doth give, grant, bargain, sell, alien, enfeoffe, release, convey and confirm, unto the said George Glen, William Hall, William Shaw and Andrew Knox.
Page 29 - ... godliness hath promise of the life that now is," as well as of that which is to come.
Page 48 - For wherein shall it be known here that I and thy people have found grace in thy sight? is it not in that thou goest with us? so shall we be separated, I and thy people, from all the people that are upon the face of the earth.
Page 42 - The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar character from the daily contemplation of superior beings and eternal interests. Not content with acknowledging in general terms an overruling Providence, they habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute.
Page 231 - And the cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts of other things entering in, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful.
Page 225 - That Jesus Christ by his sufferings and death, made an atonement for the sins of all mankind in general, and of every individual in particular; that; however, none but those who believe in him can be partakers of divine benefits.

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