From Barrow to Boothia: The Arctic Journal of Chief Factor Peter Warren Dease, 1836-1839

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Jan 23, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 330 pages
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Over a three-year period from 1837 to 1939, operating from a base-camp at Fort Confidence on Great Bear Lake, the expedition achieved its goal. Despite serious problems with sea ice, Dease and Simpson, in some of the longest small-boat voyages in the history of the Arctic, mapped the remaining gaps in a model operation of efficient, economical, and safe exploration. Thomas Simpson's narrative, the standard source on the expedition, claimed the expedition's success for himself, stating "Dease is a worthy, indolent, illiterate soul, and moves just as I give the impulse." In From Barrow to Boothia William Barr shows that Dease's contribution was absolutely crucial to the expedition's success and makes Dease's sober, sensible, and modest account of the expedition available. Dease's journal, reproduced in full, is supplemented by a brief introduction to each section and detailed annotations that clarify and elaborate the text. By including relevant correspondence to and from expedition members, Barr captures the original words of the participants, offering insights into the character of both Dease and Simpson and making clear what really happened on this successful expedition.
  

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Contents

The Men and Their Task
3
Norway House to Fort Chipewyan
28
The Winter at Fort Chipewyan
41
Down the Slave and the Mackenzie
61
West to Point Barrow and Back
70
The First Wintering at Fort Confidence
113
Eastwards 1838
167
The Second Wintering at Fort Confidence
200
Eastwards Again 1839
229
Back South to Fort Simpson
262
Aftermath
273
Assessment
294
Biographical Sketches
299
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

University of Saskatchewan

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