Manual of the Natural History, Geology, and Physics of Greenland, and the Neighboring Regions: Prepared for the Use of the Arctic Expedition of 1875, Under the Direction of the Arctic Committeee of the Royal Society, for the Use of the Expedition. Published by Authority of the Lords Commissoners of the Admiralty (Google eBook)

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H.M. Stationery Office, 1875 - Geophysics - 869 pages
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Page 714 - ... myself, were admiring the extreme beauty of this phenomenon from the observatory, we all simultaneously uttered an exclamation of surprise at seeing a bright ray of the Aurora shoot suddenly downward from the general mass of light, and between us and the land, which was there distant only three thousand yards. Had I witnessed this phenomenon by myself, I should have been disposed to receive with caution the evidence even of my own senses, as to this last fact ; but the appearance conveying precisely...
Page 742 - The electric discharges which lake place in the Polar regions between the positive electricity of the atmosphere and the negative electricity of the earth, are the essential and unique cause of the formation of the polar light...
Page 69 - Notes on the history and geographical relations of the Cetacea frequenting Davis Strait and Baffin's Bay.
Page 464 - Nordenskjold extracted, by means of the magnet, from a large quantity of material sufficient particles to determine their metallic nature and composition. These grains separate copper from a solution of the sulphate and exhibit conclusive indications of the presence of cobalt (not only before the blowpipe, but with solution of potassium-nitrite), of copper, and of nickel, though in the latter case with a smaller degree of certainty, through the reactions of this metal being of a less delicate character.
Page 81 - ... harder than the rest, was a part of the mountain; that the others were in large pieces above ground, and not of so hard a nature; that they cut it off with a hard stone, and then beat it flat into pieces of the size of a sixpence, but of an oval shape.
Page 494 - At the first glance they appeared to have been well preserved by the earth; but, on digging them up, they are found to be in a thorough state of decay. On being lighted they glow, but never emit a flame : nevertheless the inhabitants of the neighbourhood use them as fuel, and designate these subterranean trees as Adamoushtshina, or of Adam's time. The first living birch tree is not found nearer than three degrees to the south, and then only in the form of a shrub.
Page 540 - A supposition which I consider to be wholly incompatible with the data in our possession, and at variance with the laws of isothermal lines. If, however, we adopt the theory of a former submarine drift, followed by a subsequent elevation of the seabottom, as easily accounting for all the...
Page 68 - Supposing the sealing prosecuted with the same vigour as at present, I have little hesitation in stating my opinion that, before thirty years shall have passed away, the ' seal fishery ' as a source of commercial revenue will have come to a close...
Page 486 - I did, met with a few of the natives of both sexes, who treated them with civility. " It appeared to me that this peninsula must have been an island in remote times, for there were marks of the sea having flowed over the isthmus; and, even now, it appeared to be kept out by a bank of stones, sand, and wood, thrown up by the waves.
Page 649 - During several long journeys on the Arctic coast, in the early spring before any thaw had taken place, the only water to be obtained was by melting snow or ice. By experience I found that a kettleful of water could be obtained by thawing ice with a much less expenditure of fuel, and in a shorter time, than was required to obtain a similar quantity of water by thawing snow. Now, as we had to carry our fuel with us, this saving of fuel and of time was an important consideration, and we always endeavoured...

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