Truer Than True Romance: Classic Love Comics Retold

Front Cover
Watson-Guptill Publications, 2001 - Humor - 112 pages
14 Reviews
A zany parody of the romance comics of the 1950s to the 1970s offers an irreverent approach to dating attitudes and romantic advice, updating ten classic DC Comics romance stories with all-new word balloons and captions to accompany the original artwork. Original.

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Review: Truer Than True Romance: Classic Love Comics Retold

User Review  - Rich Meyer - Goodreads

An interesting approach, this little book tries to almost MST3K-ify old romance comics. All the dialogue and story has been replaced with suitably warped comedy. Some are real funny; some are just ... Read full review

Review: Truer Than True Romance: Classic Love Comics Retold

User Review  - Emily - Goodreads

This is a cute idea. One of my favorite things is when someone tries to update something and then a few years pass so the update has become doubly dated. So yeah, some jokes about the 90s pasted over ... Read full review

Contents

Confanfo
6
Ask Dr Mary Licensed Therapist
27
Lesson in Love
36

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

In Her Own Words...

"I have always been intrigued by the notion that what is happening at the exact moment in history when we are born shapes us as human beings-in ways about which we can only speculate.

"In 1958, the year I was born, the beatnik movement was spreading throughout the U.S.; the cha-cha was the hot dance craze; the first parking meters appeared in London; de Gaulle was elected president of France; Khrushchev became the premier of the Soviet Union; Alaska was voted the 49th state in the U.S.; Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote was published; the Nobel prize for Literature was won by Boris Pasternak; the Guggenheim Museum opened in New York City; Gigi won best picture at the Oscars; the first domestic jet airline passenger service in the U.S. opened; and the first U.S. satellite, Explorer I, was put into orbit. I am not quite sure how (or if) all these happenings affected me, but I still find it interesting to contemplate.

"As a child I was fascinated by astrology for the same reason; I thought it not at all unlikely that a person could somehow be influenced by the position of Earth in relation to the stars and the planets. In the chaotic and confusing world in which we live, I believe it is natural for us to look for ways that connect us-to each other, to the events of history, to the planet. In today's hi-tech age of computers and virtual reality, children need this sense of context and continuity more than ever.

"When I begin working on a book for The Year You Were Born series, I have to totally clear the decks in my life. The research for the book is very intense--it never seems as if there will be enough time to find a perfect event for each day of the year. I want so much for kids to have an interesting, exciting or fun entry on their very own birthday or in their birth month. In sifting through the events, trends, fads and statistics of the year, I make an effort to keep a good balance between entertaining and informing the reader. When I was young I loved reading about weird happenings, crazy contests, and fantastic world records, so I try to include as much of that kind of thing as I can. I think parents enjoy these books as much as their children do, but most of all, I love watching kids' eyes light up whenever I read to them from The Year You Were Born about something that took place on the very day they came into the world.

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