The Treaty of Ghent, and the fisheries: or, The diplomatic talents of John Quincy Adams, candidly examined (Google eBook)

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Printed by J.H.A. Frost, 1824 - Technology & Engineering - 27 pages
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Page 16 - Whereas differences have arisen respecting the Liberty claimed by the United States for the Inhabitants thereof, to take, dry, and cure Fish on certain Coasts, Bays, Harbours, and Creeks of His Britannic Majesty's Dominions in America...
Page 16 - Labrador; but so soon as the same or any portion thereof, shall be settled it shall not be lawful for the said Fishermen to dry or cure Fish at such Portion so settled, without previous agreement for such purpose with the Inhabitants. Proprietors, or Possessors of the ground.
Page 4 - That the British government did not intend to grant to the United States, gratuitously, the privileges formerly granted by treaty to them, -of fishing within the limits of the British sovereignty, and of using the shores of the British territories for purposes connected with the fisheries.
Page 7 - He said, certainly : it had been that as, on the one hand. Great Britain could not permit the vessels of the United States to fish within the creeks and close upon the shores of the British territories, so, on the other hand, it was by no means her intention to interrupt them in fishing anywhere in the open sea, or without the territorial jurisdiction, a marine league from the shore ; and.
Page 17 - American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying or curing fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to them.
Page 16 - Parties, that the Inhabitants of the said United States shall have forever, in common with the Subjects of His Britannic Majesty, the Liberty to take Fish of every kind on that part of the Southern Coast of Newfoundland which extends from Cape Ray to the Rameau Islands, on the Western and...
Page 16 - Islands, on the western and northern coast of Newfoundland, from the said Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands, on the shores of the Magdalen Islands, and also on the coasts, bays, harbours, and creeks from Mount Joly, on the southern coast of Labrador, to and through the Straits of Belle Isle, and thence northwardly indefinitely along the coast...
Page 16 - And the United States hereby renounce forever, any Liberty, heretofore enjoyed or claimed by the Inhabitants thereof, to take, dry or cure Fish on, or within three marine Miles of any of the Coasts, Bays, Creeks or Harbours of His Britannic Majesty's Dominions in America not included within the abovementioned limits : Provided, however, that the American Fishermen shall be.
Page 6 - This important subject will claim your early attention. The measure thus promptly taken by the British Government, without any communication with this Government, notwithstanding the declaration of our Ministers at Ghent that our right would not be affected by the silence of the treaty, indicates a spirit which excites equal surprise and regret one which by no means corresponds with the amicable relations established between the two countries by that treaty, or with the spirit with which it has...
Page 11 - To a position of this novel nature Great Britain cannot accede. She knows of no exception to the rule, that all treaties are put an end to by a subsequent war between the same parties...

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