Cratylus

Front Cover
Hackett Publishing, Jan 1, 1998 - Philosophy - 103 pages
8 Reviews
The Cratylus, Plato's sole dialogue devoted to the relation between language and reality, is acknowledged to be one of his masterpieces. But owing to its often enigmatic content no more than a handful of passages from it have played a part in the global evaluation of Plato's philosophy. This new English translation by C D C Reeve is the first since 1926, and incomparably the most helpful and accessible now available. It opens up the Cratylus to all philosophically interested readers, as well as to cultural historians and to those whose primary concern is the history of linguistics. The full and lucid introduction does much to illuminate the internal dynamic of this important text and to explain its place within Plato's oeuvre.
  

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Review: Cratylus

User Review  - Zach Vowles - Goodreads

It was very clever, and I learned a bit from it. However, I found myself getting a bit bored with it towards the end. Great from a linguistic point of view though. Read full review

Review: Cratylus

User Review  - Tamsyn - Goodreads

In a nutshell, this dialogue addresses the question "What's in a name?", but rather than romantic-mooning-over-a-forbidden-love a la Mr Shakespeare, Plato prefers to have Socrates poke fun at the ... Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
ix
INTRODUCTION
xi
1 Hermogenes and Cratylus on Names
xii
2 Natures Actions and the Truth in Names
xiv
3 The Maker of Names
xix
4 Natures and Forms Names and Shuttles
xxi
5 Homer on the Correctness of Names
xxiii
6 The Testimony of Names Themselves
xxvi
9 Cratylus on Truth Falsity and Fitting
xxxvi
10 Convention Returns
xl
11 Knowledge and Instruction
xlii
12 Heracliteanism
xliv
13 Socrates on the Correctness of Names
xlvii
PLATOS CRATYLUS
1
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
97
INDEX OF NAMES DISCUSSED IN THE CRATYLUS
101

7 The Etymologies
xxx
8 Primary Names
xxxiii

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About the author (1998)

Plato was born c. 427 B.C. in Athens, Greece, to an aristocratic family very much involved in political government. Pericles, famous ruler of Athens during its golden age, was Plato's stepfather. Plato was well educated and studied under Socrates, with whom he developed a close friendship. When Socrates was publically executed in 399 B.C., Plato finally distanced himself from a career in Athenian politics, instead becoming one of the greatest philosophers of Western civilization. Plato extended Socrates's inquiries to his students, one of the most famous being Aristotle. Plato's The Republic is an enduring work, discussing justice, the importance of education, and the qualities needed for rulers to succeed. Plato felt governors must be philosophers so they may govern wisely and effectively. Plato founded the Academy, an educational institution dedicated to pursuing philosophic truth. The Academy lasted well into the 6th century A.D., and is the model for all western universities. Its formation is along the lines Plato laid out in The Republic. Many of Plato's essays and writings survive to this day. Plato died in 347 B.C. at the age of 80.

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