Principles of social science, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J.B. Lippincott & co., 1860 - Social sciences
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Contents

Constant acceleration of the societary movement
64
Changes in the proportions of society resulting from increase in
66
CHAPTER XXII
72
French laud being more divided the small proprietor profits by increase
78
Rude character of British products as compared with those of France
84
That of France looks to their emancipation from taxation Solidarity
90
13 Increasing independence of France resulting from tho pursuit of a policy
98
CHAPTER XXIII
107
Prussian tariff having for its objoct the diversification of the employments
125
Great increase of foreign and domestic commerce consequent upon
131
Increasing steadiness of the societary movement consequent upon
137
Increased respect for the rights of property consequent upon its more
144
How protection affects foreign commerce and the public revenue 100
161
Sweden like Russia follows in the lead of Franco maintaining
167
Differing in race habits manners and religion Franco and Germany
174
Early tendencies towards the adoption of the protective policy of Colbert
181
American policy generally in full accordance with the doctrines of
189
Facta here observed correspond precisely with those observed in Britain
191
The nearer the place of conversion to that of production the greater
195
Agriculture being the pursuit that requires the largest amount of know
201
CHAPTER XXVII
207
Waste of power resulting from the exhaustion of the soil and consequent
214
Trader profits by instability Remarkable irregularity in the movement
221
CHAPTER XXVIII
228
Forbidding Ihe creation of a domestio market it thus maintain the
233
Growing commerce tends towards development of the latent powers
241
Definition of price Prices of raw materials rise as we approach
301
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
308
Raw materials tend to leave the countries in which employments nro
314
J Money the indispensable instrument of society Of all the instruments
322
The use of circulating notes tends to diminish the valuo of the precious
331
Error of distinguished economists in supposing that interest is paid
338
The utility of money increases as its circulation becomes more rapid
344
Teachings of economists generally in regard to money directly opposed
353
Decentralization produces diminution therein Man then becomes more
359
Enlargement of tho operations of discount banks
365
CHAPTER XXXIV
372
Effect of those measures that of giving to the moneyed capitalist increased
379
Currency in use almost a constant quantity Changes in its amount
388
Of the private banks of England Their existence due to the bank
394
Enormous overtrading of the London banks
402
Other communities of the world prosper in the direct ratio of their inde
409
Those changes due to irregularity in the movements of the one great
415
Its progress since that time Large proportion borne by capital to
420
Steadiness in its own value the great desideratum in a currency Ten
426
Instability of American policy Periods of protection and free trade
436
CHAPTER XXXVII
446
Throughout inconsistent with himself His mode of studying the action
449
General accordance of the views of Hume and Adam Smith
459
Doctrines of the RicardoMalthusian school in regard to money
466
His inconsistencies with himself
472
The precious metals the great instruments furnished by tho Creator
479

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Page 446 - the Essay before referred to, " properly speaking, one of the subjects of commerce, but only the instrument which all have agreed upon to facilitate the exchange of one commodity for another. It is none of the wheels of trade: it is the oil which renders the
Page 179 - or a public school. Meetings are called for the sole purpose of declaring their disapprobation of the line of conduct pursued by the government; while in other assemblies the citizens salute the authorities of the day as the fathers of their country. Societies are formed which regard drunkenness as the principal cause of the evils
Page 458 - who tells his readers, in his examination of what is commonly denominated the Mercantile System, that — "A country that has wherewithal to buy wine, will always get the wine which it has occasion for; and a country that has wherewithal to buy gold and silver, will never be in want of those metals. They
Page 198 - In traversing that county, one will discover numerous farmhouses, once the abode of industrious and intelligent freemen, now occupied by slaves, or tenantless, deserted, and dilapidated; he will observe fields, once fertile, now unfenced, abandoned, and covered with those evil harbingers, foxtail and
Page 252 - is the natural and normal condition of the laboring man. whether white or black. The great evil of Northern free society," as it continues, "is. that it is burdened with a servile class of mechanics and laborers, unfit for self-government, and yet clothed with the attributes and powers of citizens. Master and
Page 453 - Increase of their cheapness, in his opinion, rendered them " rather less fit for the purposes of money than they were before. In order to make the same purchases, we must," as he thought, "load ourselves with a greater quantity of them, and carry about a shilling in our pockets where we carried a groat before.
Page 198 - that once furnished happy homes for a dozen white families. Indeed, a country in its infancy, where fifty years ago scarce a forest tree had been felled by the axe of the pioneer, is already exhibiting the painful
Page 198 - culture of cotton. Our small planters, after taking the cream off their lands, unable to restore them by rest, manures, or otherwise, are going further West and South in search of other virgin lands, which they may
Page 466 - approvingly, the ideas of Hume as to the effect that would result from having every person in a nation to " wake and find a gold coin in his pocket" — suggesting, however, that we might better suppose " that to every pound, or shilling, or penny in the possession of any one, another pound, shilling, or penny were
Page 447 - same quantity of goods, it can have no effect, good or bad, taking a nation within itself—any more than it would make an alteration in a merchant's books if, instead of the Arabian method of notation, which requires few characters, he should make use of the Koman, which requires a great many.

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