The Lost Rocks: The Dare Stones and the Unsolved Mystery of Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colony (Google eBook)

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eBookIt.com, Jul 10, 2012 - History - 288 pages
3 Reviews
What if the 1587 Lost Colony of Roanoke was not lost? What if the survivors left Roanoke Island, North Carolina and found their way to Georgia? That is the scenario scholars contemplated when a series of engraved stones were found in the 1930's. The first, found near the Chowan River in North Carolina, claimed that Eleanor Dare and a few other settlers had made their way inland after an Indian attack wiped out the rest of the colony. Among the dead were Eleanor's daughter, Virginia Dare, the first English child born in North America, and Eleanor's husband Ananias. The remaining Dare Stones, more than forty in number, told a fantastic tale of how Eleanor and the survivors made their way overland, first to South Carolina, and then to Georgia. If true, North Carolina stood to lose one of its most cherished historical legends. Author David La Vere weaves the story of the Dare Stones with that of the Lost Colony of Roanoke in a tale that will fire your imagination and give you pause at the same time. In this true story that shook the world during the 1930s and early 1940s, the question on everyone's mind was: Had the greatest American mystery - the Lost Colony - finally been solved?
  

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Review: The Lost Rocks: The Dare Stones and the Unsolved Mystery of Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colony

User Review  - Ann - Goodreads

In 1584 (36 years before the Mayflower) 117 English colonists arrived on the shores of North Carolina. Three years later their leader sailed back to England for supplies - when he returned the ... Read full review

Review: The Lost Rocks: The Dare Stones and the Unsolved Mystery of Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colony

User Review  - Cheryl - Goodreads

Caveat: these are ramblings, not a book review! These are my thoughts following a long FB thread on the same topic. I'm just going to write out my thoughts regarding the La Vere book here in a note. I ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
Chapter
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Afterword
Endnotes

Chapter 8

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

David La Vere is a professor of history at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington. He is author of The Texas Indians, His Ph.D. is from Texas A&M University.

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