Weep Not, Child

Front Cover
Pearson Education, Limited, 1987 - Fiction - 136 pages
42 Reviews
"Two small boys stand on a rubbish heap and look into the future. One boy is excited, he is beginning school; the other, his brother, is an apprentice carpetner. Together, they will serve their country--the teacher and the craftsman. But this is Kenya and times are against them. In the forests, the Mau Mau are waging war against the white government, and two brothers, Njoroge and Kamau, and the rest of their family, need to decide where their loyalties lie. For the practical man, the choice is simple, but for Njoroge, the scholar, the dream of progress through learning is a hard one to give up"--P. [4] of cover.

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The ending, I think, is perfect. - Goodreads
good creative writing that gives hope the helpless. - Goodreads
I plan to read more of his beautiful writing. - Goodreads
It was. However, it had some serious pacing problems. - Goodreads
Not sure about the ending though. - Goodreads

Review: Weep Not, Child

User Review  - Judy - Goodreads

Romeo and Juliet, meet the Joads of Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath. Set in Kenya, this is the story of Njoroge, a young Kikuyu boy who befriends Mwihaki, a girl whose father hates Njoroge's father. The ... Read full review

Review: Weep Not, Child

User Review  - Zach - Goodreads

The writing style is simple, and Thiong'o is a good storyteller. That said, it seemed disconnected at times and huge gaps occur that you have to fill in yourself. I was hoping to get a bit more information about Kenyan culture from this, but it didn't seem to be what I was hoping for. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
62
Section 2
67
Section 3
72
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1987)

Ngugi is world famous for his novels from Weep Not, Child to Matigari and the impact of his plays, especially in Gikuyu, which led to his detention in Kenya. He is now Professor of Comparative Literature and Performance Studies in New York University. This book reflects many of the concerns found in Decolonising the Mind and Moving the Centre.

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