Collected Short Stories, Volume 4

Front Cover
Penguin, 1978 - Fiction - 464 pages
41 Reviews
These thirty stories--most set in the colonies at a time when the Empire was still assured, in a world in which men and women were caught between their own essentially European values and the richness and ambiguity of their unfamiliar surroundings--show a master of the genre at the peak of his power.
  

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Review: Collected Short Stories: Volume 1 (Collected Short Stories of W. Somerset Maugham #1)

User Review  - Krisz - Goodreads

Maugham is a great storyteller. I first read Moon and Sixpence from him and I had to stop reading and try and analyse why is it so bloody good - the story itself is not so fantastic, but the way he ... Read full review

Review: Collected Short Stories: Volume 3 (Collected Short Stories of W. Somerset Maugham #3)

User Review  - Sketchbook - Goodreads

In 1915 MOM was based in Geneva as a UK spy, WW1. His cover, as a writer-playwright, was perfect. He was then writing a comedy, "Caroline," which opened in London in 1916, starring Irene Vanbrugh and ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

PREFACE
3
THE BOOKBAG
5
FRENCH JOE
38
GERMAN HARRY
42
THE FOUR DUTCHMEN
46
THE BACK OF BEYOND
52
P O
82
EPISODE
111
WINTER CRUISE
235
MABEL
252
MASTERSON
256
PRINCESS SEPTEMBER
265
A MARRIAGE OF CONVENIENCE
273
MIRAGE
285
THE LETTER
303
THE OUTSTATION
334

THE KITE
130
A WOMAN OF FIFTY
152
MAYHEW
169
THE LOTUS EATER
172
SALVATORE
186
THE WASHTUB
190
A MAN WITH A CONSCIENCE
198
AN OFFICIAL POSITION
217
THE PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN
362
RAW MATERIAL
367
STRAIGHT FLUSH
370
THE END OF THE FLIGHT
376
A CASUAL AFFAIR
381
RED
400
NEIL MACADAM
419
Copyright

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About the author (1978)

W. Somerset Maugham was born in 1874 and lived in Paris until he was ten. He was educated at King's School, Canterbury, and at Heidelberg University. He afterwards walked the wards of St. Thomas's Hospital with a view to practice in medicine, but the success of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), won him over to letters. Something of his hospital experience is reflected, however, in the first of his masterpieces, Of Human Bondage (1915), and with The Moon and Sixpence (1919) his reputation as a novelist was assured.

His position as one of the most successful playwrights on the London stage was being consolidated simultaneously. His first play, A Man of Honour (1903), was followed by a procession of successes just before and after the First World War. (At one point only Bernard Shaw had more plays running at the same time in London.) His theatre career ended with Sheppey (1933).

His fame as a short-story writer began with The Trembling of a Leaf, sub-titled Little Stories of the South Sea Islands, in 1921, after which he published more than ten collections.

W. Somerset Maugham's general books are fewer in number. They include travel books, such as On a Chinese Screen (1922) and Don Fernando (1935), essays, criticism, and the self-revealing The Summing Up (1938) and A Writer's Notebook (1949).

W. Somerset Maugham became a Companion of Honour in 1954. He died in 1965.

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