Yearbook of agriculture. 1921 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1922
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 34 - contract market." as hereinafter provided, and if such contract is evidenced by a record in writing which .shows the date, the parties to such contract and their addresses, the property covered and its price, and the terms of delivery...
Page 18 - Agriculture, the general designs and duties of which shall be to acquire and to diffuse among the people of the United States useful information on subjects connected with agriculture in the most general and comprehensive sense of that word, and to procure, propagate, and distribute among the people new and valuable seeds and plants.
Page 791 - New England Maine New Hampshire Vermont Massachusetts Rhode Island Connecticut Middle Atlantic New York New Jersey Pennsylvania East North Central Ohio Indiana Illinois Michigan Wisconsin West North Central Minnesota Iowa Missouri...
Page 8 - ... increased tremendously during the past three years. The freight charge is very nearly doubled, and in some cases more than doubled. When wheat was selling at $2.50 per bushel, corn at $1.75, cattle and hogs at $16 to $22 per hundred, cotton at 30 cents per pound, the increased freight rate was not a serious matter. It amounted to but few cents relatively and was a small item in the total price. But with wheat at $1, corn at 48 cents, cattle and hogs at $7 to $10 per hundred, cotton at 17 to 20...
Page 182 - The average length of time from the last killing frost in the spring to the first killing frost in the fall ranges from 170 days in the southeastern part of the state to 75 days near the Michigan boundary.
Page 233 - The driving occurred in the spring and summer and required about six weeks. Ohio, chiefly, and Kentucky were said to have supplied the eastern markets from 1840 to 1850 with nine-tenths of the western corn-fed cattle which they received. Grass-fattened cattle were sent in the fall in limited numbers from Ohio, but no cattle arrived in those markets from the West during the winter. In 1820 colonists from the East settled in Texas about Austin, and engaged principally in cattle raising. However, the...
Page 340 - Arkansas, western Tennessee, and northern Louisiana, and into Texas and Oklahoma. The densest production of cotton is found on the soils most suitable for its production in the center of this belt. (Figs. 9 and 13.) Both soil and climate are very important factors in the determination of areas suitable for cotton production. About two-thirds of the Cotton Belt consists of a broad coastal plain, composed principally of sedimentary materials, bordering and largely derived from two ancient and mucheroded...
Page 314 - A survey made in 1920 indicated that at that time nearly 32 per cent was consumed in the North Atlantic States, which comprise New England, New York. Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. The next largest quantity, or 24 per cent, was consumed in the east-north-central division. In other words, more than 55 per cent of the total consumption of beef and veal occurred in the territory east of the Mississippi and north of the Ohio River and Maryland. The smallest total consumption occurred in the South Atlantic...
Page 18 - Marketing Is Part of Production. Marketing is as truly a part of production as is the growing of the crops, for the crops have no value unless they can be put into the hands of those who need them. The assembling, storing, and distributing of farm products are productive enterprises and those engaged in this work require much the same economic and technical information as that required by farmers.
Page iii - ... corn, beef, and cotton. The subject is treated in four separate chapters. These discussions take the place of the briefer, less comprehensive articles, chiefly on production subjects, presented in previous Yearbooks. A graphic summary of the agricultural census of 1920 is added, and the statistical section has been strengthened by the inclusion of cost of production data and by some new statistics of marketing and production. The Yearbook for 1921, therefore, emphasizes the economic side of our...

Bibliographic information