A Domestic Treatise on the Diseases of Horses and Dogs ... (Google eBook)

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T. Boosey, 1810 - Veterinary medicine - 249 pages
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Page 144 - ... he took the first opportunity to escape, and regain his lonely situation. With true benevolence, the worthy clergyman permitted him to follow the bent of his inclinations; but to soften the rigour of his fate, he built him a small kennel upon the grave, which was replenished once a day with food and water.
Page 143 - A large setter, ill with the distemper, had been most tenderly nursed by a lady for three weeks. At length he became so weak as to be placed on a bed, where he remained three days in a dying situation. After a short absence, the lady, on re-entering the room, observed him to fix his eyes attentively on her, and make an effort to crawl across the bed towards her. This he accomplished evidently for the sole purpose of licking her hands, which, having done, he expired without a groan. " I am,
Page 155 - I have seen, when this has been injudiciously done, tho whole tail in a state of mortification. The quantity of blood drawn should be regulated by the size of the dog : for a very small dog, one or two ounces are sufficient ; for a middling sized dog, three or four ounces ; and for a large dog, five, six, seven, or eight ounces, according to the size and strength of the patient, and tho nature of the disease he labours under.
Page 143 - as convinced that the animal was sensible of his approaching dissolution, and that this was a last forcible effort to express his gratitude for the care taken of him, as I am of my own existence ; and had I witnessed this proof of excellence alone, I should think a life devoted to the melioration of the condition of dogs far too little for their deserts.
Page 143 - Olave, Tooley Street, Borough, the churchyard is detached from the church, and surrounded with high buildings, so as to be wholly inaccessible but by one large close gate. A poor tailor, of this parish, dying, left a small cur dog inconsolable for his loss.
Page 51 - ... supposed to imply nothing more than the symptoms and appearances which usually betoken health. Thus, when a horse is in perfect health, he ought, under this view of it, to be considered as in perfect condition; and, on the contrary, when a horse is in any respect out of...
Page 225 - ... in a pint of water to half a pint; strain carefully, and press out the liquor very firmly; put back the ingredients into a pint of milk, and boil again to half a pint ; strain as before ; mix both liquors, which forms three doses for a human subject. Double this quantity is proper for a horse or cow. Two thirds...
Page 155 - The quantity of blood drawn must be regulated by the size of the dog : for a very small dog, one or two ounces are sufficient ; for a middling sized dog, three or four ounces ; and for a large dog, five, six, seven, or eight ounces, according to size, .strength, and the nature of the disease. Blindness.
Page 25 - ... dim, general decay proceeds rapidly, though the life of some dogs is extended to fifteen, sixteen, or seventeen years ; and I have seen a mother and son vigorous at twenty and twenty-one years old. Although such instances as the latter must be considered as rare, yet even these have...

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