A Handbook for Travellers in Lower and Upper Egypt, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1880 - Egypt - 562 pages
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Page 458 - ... of the wedge or other instrument which should have been employed for reducing those fragments to the state in which they now appear. The fissures seen across the head and in the pedestal are the work of a later period, when some of the pieces were cut for millstones by the Arabs.
Page 489 - The fourth line is composed of men of a white nation, clad in long white garments, with a blue border, tied at the neck, and ornamented with a cross or other devices. On their head is either a close cap, or their natural hair, short, and of a red colour, and they have a small beard. Some bring long gloves, which, with their close sleeves, indicate, as well as their colour, that they are the inhabitants of a cold climate. Among Other offerings are vases, similar to those of the Kufa, a chariot and...
Page 26 - Spinola, was newly opened and entirely re-furnished about two years ago. Its situation, opposite the celebrated Theatre "Carlo...
Page 378 - I visited this place, and found it to surpass description ; for if all the walls and other great works of the Greeks could be put together in one, they would not equal, either for labour or expense, this Labyrinth; and yet the temple of Ephesus is a building worthy of note, and so is the temple of Samos.
Page 459 - Beyond these is a corps of infantry in close array, flanked by a strong body of chariots; and a camp, indicated by a rampart of Egyptian shields, with a wicker gateway, guarded by...
Page 424 - ... humble cell, in which he had dwelt above fifty years, without opening his door, without seeing the face of a woman, and without tasting any food that had been prepared by fire, or any human art. Five days of the week he spent in prayer and meditation ; but on Saturdays and Sundays he regularly opened a small window, and gave audience to the crowd of suppliants who successively flowed from every part of the Christian world. The eunuch of Theodosius approached the window with respectful steps,...
Page 460 - Those who have succeeded in reaching the opposite bank are rescued by their friends, who, drawn up in three phalanxes (described in the hieroglyphics as 8000 strong), witness the defeat of their comrades, and the flight of the remainder of their chariots. Some carry to the rear the lifeless corpse of their chief, who has been drowned in the river, and in vain endeavour to restore life, by holding his head downwards to expel the water ; and others implore the clemency of the victor, and acknowledge...
Page 2 - From ARDROSSAN the Splendid Saloon Steamer " BRODICK CASTLE " sails daily to and from the ISLAND OF ARRAN, in connection with the Express Train Service.
Page 524 - No Gothic architect in his wildest moments ever played so freely with his lines and dimensions, and none, it must be added, ever produced anything so beautifully picturesque as this. It contains all the play of light and shade, all the variety of Gothic art, with the massiveness and grandeur of the Egyptian style...
Page 494 - ... inches. The faces of the obelisks, particularly those which are opposite each other, are remarkable for a slight convexity of their centres, which appears to have been introduced to obviate the shadow thrown by the sun, even when on a line with a plane - surface. The exterior angle thus formed by the intersecting lines of direction of either side of the face is about 3 degrees ; and this is one of many proofs of their attentive observation of the phenomena of nature.

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