Physiological researches upon life and death (Google eBook)

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Smith & Maxwell, 1809 - Death (Biology) - 300 pages
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Page iv - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page iv - Title] in conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, intituled 'An Act for the encouragement of Learning by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts and Books to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies during the times therein mentioned.
Page iv - An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned." And also to the act, entitled " An Act supplementary to an Act, entitled, " An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the time therein mentioned," and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and...
Page 68 - ... entering the lung is to build on shifting sand an edifice solid itself but which soon falls for lack of an assured base. This instability of the vital forces marks all vital phenomena with an irregularity which distinguishes them from physical phenomena remarkable for their uniformity. It is easy to see that the science of organized bodies should be treated in a manner quite different from those which have unorganized bodies for object.
Page 37 - The action of the mind on each feeling of pain or pleasure, arising from a sensation, consists in a comparison between that sensation and those which have preceded it. The greater the difference between the actual and past impressions, the more ardent will be the feeling. That sensation would affect us most which we had never experienced before. "It follows, therefore, that our sensations make a greater or less impression upon us according to the frequency of their repetition, because the comparison...
Page 113 - It is a fundamental law of the 45 distribution of vital powers,' says Bichat, ' that when they are increased in one part, they are diminished in all the rest of the living economy...
Page 66 - The one constantly varying in their intenseness, energy, and development, often pass with rapidity from the lowest degree of prostration to the highest point of exaltation...
Page 31 - ... night, dressed himself completely, and to the inexpressible terror of his lady, seized the bed, with her in it, carried it into an adjoining room and placed it on the hearth.
Page 37 - ... frequency of their repetition, because the comparison becomes less sensible between their past and actual state. Every time that we see an object, hear a sound, or taste a dish, we find less difference between what we experience and what we have experienced. "The nature of pleasure and of pain is thus to destroy themselves, to cease to exist, because they have existed. The art of prolonging the duration of our enjoyments consists in varying their causes.
Page 45 - ... immediate effects of the emotions and passions upon the organic system. He says : " Strict observation proves to us that the parts subservient to the internal functions are constantly affected by them, and are ever determined according to the state in which they may be. The effect of every kind of passion is to produce some change, some alteration in organic life. Anger accelerates the circulation, and increases, often in an incommensurable proportion, the effort of the heart ; it is on the force,...

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