Chief Marin: Leader, Rebel, and Legend

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Heyday, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 292 pages
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Cultural Writing. American History. Native American Studies. It's a little known fact that the San Francisco Bay Area's Marin County is named after a Coast Miwok chief who achieved notoriety for defying Spanish authority over his people. Anthropologist and archaeologist Betty Goerke has pieced together a portrait of the life of this Native American leader, using mission records, ethnographies, explorers' and missionaries' diaries and correspondence, and other material. Chief Marin became a leader of Native resistance to Spanish colonization at that critical time when, as the mission system collapsed, California would once again be transformed, this time by Americans. With marvelous detail, Goerke paints a picture of the California of Marin's time: the sights, smells, and sounds of the land; the traditions the Coast Miwok fought to preserve; and the colonial system against which Marin and other Native American leaders struggled to keep their way of life.
  

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Contents

The Natural World of the Coast Miwok
1
Archaeological Evidence
10
Culture of the Coast Miwok
17
Early Contact with Europeans
34
Huicmuse Becomes Marino
44
Early San Rafael Mission
71
Marino Joins an Expedition
95
Marino Quintino and Pomponio
105
The Last Days of Mexican California
155
The Coast Miwok Lose Their Nicasio Land
170
Against All Odds
179
A Cast of Characters
201
B Timeline for Marino
206
San Rafael Mission Census 18151845
210
J Maps
216
References
264

Marinos Whereabouts 18251832
120
Marino Returns to the San Rafael Mission
128
Deaths at San Rafael
148

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About the author (2007)

Betty Goerke has taught anthropology and archaelogy at the College of Marin for over thirty years. She has conducted fieldwork in California, Colorado, Greece, Holland, Kenya, and India.

Bibliographic information