First Along the River: A Brief History of the U.S. Environmental Movement

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 2000 - Nature - 184 pages
2 Reviews
First Along the River is the first concise, accessible, and informative introduction to the U.S. environmental movement that covers the colonial period through 1999. It provides students with a balanced, historical perspective on the history of the environmental movement in relation to major social and political events in U.S. history. The book highlights important people and events, places critical concepts in context, and shows the impact of government, industry, and population on the American landscape. Comprehensive yet brief, First Along the River discusses the religious and philosophical beliefs that shaped Americans' relationship to the environment, traces the origins and development of government regulations that impact Americans' use of natural resources, and shows why popular environmental groups were founded and how they changed over time.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - billsearth - LibraryThing

This book is a great one for chronicling the history of protecting wildlands and species in the United States. There are even summaries every so often to highlight stages in the history of protection and stewardship. Read full review

Review: First Along The River: A Brief History Of The Us Environmental Movement

User Review  - Nicole McCann - Goodreads

a fantastic little brief history of the us environmental movement! it was a great book to read while transitioning into my graduate studies in environmental policy. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Philosophical Foundations
3
Seeking New Land
5
Rational Nature of the World
8
Social and Political Thought in the Eighteenth Century
10
Conclusion
12
The 1400s through the 1700s Inhabiting a New Land
13
Native Americans as Prototypical Environmentalists
14
The Environmental Movement Begins to Mobilize
77
Conclusion
82
The 1970s The Conservation Movement Matures
84
New Environmental Legislation
92
Jimmy Carter and the Envirocrats
96
Conclusion
99
The 1980s A Conservative Backlash
101
George Bush as the Environmental President
104

Early Colonial Environmental Attitudes
17
Conclusion
21
The Early 1800s Destroying the Frontier
23
Manifest Destiny
24
Domesticating the Wilderness
26
Final Conquest of the West
29
Renewed Interest in Nature
31
Conclusion
35
The Late 1880s Building an Industrial Nation
37
Devastating the Land
40
Overconsumption of Natural Resources
42
Voices for Nature
46
Conclusion
49
The 1900s through the 1930s Beginnings of the Conservation Movement
51
Conservation during the Progressive Era
52
Environmental Decay during the Roaring Twenties
60
Conservation Policies under Roosevelts New Deal
64
Conclusion
67
The 1940s through the 1960s Prelude to the Green Decade
70
The Conservative 1950s
72
Emerging Voices in the 1960s
73
Employment versus the Environment
107
Environmental Groups Actions and Reactions
109
International Environmental Concern
110
Conclusion
114
The Early 1990s Government Retrenchment and Public Apathy
116
A Growing Countermovement
118
A Green Revival
120
A Conservative Resurgence
125
Conclusion
131
The Late 1990s The Institutionalization of the Environmental Movement
133
Growing Public Concern
138
New Activism
141
Congressional Action and Inaction
144
The Global Future of the Environmental Movement
149
Conclusion
152
Conclusion
155
Glossary
160
Bibliography and Suggested Readings
174
Index
179
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Benjamin Kline is professor of history at DeAnza College.

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