Practical canoeing (Google eBook)

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Norie & Wilson, 1883
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Page 91 - THROUGH FRANCE AND BELGIUM, BY RIVER AND CANAL, IN THE STEAM YACHT " YTENE." By WJC MOENS, RVYC 1 vol. 8vo. With Illustrations. 15s.
Page 25 - The after part of the earing is fastened to the boom by a "clench," or by forming an eye by sewing the end back to the standing part, and then seizing the eye to the boom. Then lead the reef earing up through brass rings, which are firmly stitched on the sail on...
Page 26 - The hand reef line h is fast to the batten d, and leads down through rings on the sail and a ring on the boom, and is finished off by having a ring spliced into its own end. This line is used for snugging that part of the sail where the reef gear does not come, and the ring at the end of h is in such case taken hold of by means of a boathook till brought into hand, and is hitched to the cleat n on the boom (Plate XLI.). The hand reef line may also be used when the sail has to be shortened quickly...
Page 5 - Canoes eligible for these races shall not be over the following dimensions, viz. : first class, any material and build ; greatest length over all, from stem to sternpost, not more than 20ft., with a limit of beam of 2ft. ; but the beam may be increased by l^in. for each whole foot of length decreased ; greatest depth at fore end of well under the centre of the deck to the garboards, not more than 16in. Fixed keel of wood not more than 2in. deep, including metal band, which must not exceed one-half...
Page 5 - ... a very perfect class of sea-going sailing canoes have been produced ; and as the canoes we are about now to consider are to conform strictly to the club rule, it may be advisable to set the rule out in full. " Canoes eligible for these races shall not be over the following dimensions, viz. : first class, any material and build ; greatest length over all, from stem to sternpost, not more than 20ft., with a limit of beam of 2ft. ; but the beam may be increased by l^in. for each whole foot of length...
Page 34 - When lowered, the masthead will fall right in front of the canoeist, and, by taking off the collar which holds forestay, the mast can be drawn aft and stowed below, leaving nothing on deck but the stay, and can be set up again while afloat with equal ease.
Page 77 - The canoeist, brought to face the beauties and the terrors of nature in silence and alone, is, I say, more likely to turn his mind to grave and worthy thoughts concerning these things, and the Ruler of them, than he who is hurried along in the distractions of a crowd in trains, coaches, and hotels.
Page 25 - Make the standing part fast by clenching it through the cringle or eyelet hole on the luff of the sail at d (as shown in the rigging plan) ; then take it away aft in line with the batten, and reeve it through the block g ; lead forward again to and through...
Page 34 - When the gunter brass has been lowered, the boom may be topped up to the mast, which for light airs is a sufficiently snug method, but in stronger winds something further is required.
Page 26 - ... by chocks. To this the jackstay is fastened, and the tack rove through a thimble seized to the ring. Thus rigged, the sail can be taken right off the mast from aft, and replaced with equal ease.

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