The Source

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Fawcett Crest, 1983 - Fiction - 1088 pages
25 Reviews
In the grand storytelling style that is his signature, James Michener sweeps us back through time to the very beginnings of the Jewish faith, thousands of years ago. Through the predecessors of four modern men and women, we experience the entire colorful history of the Jews, including the life of the early Hebrews and their persecutions, the impact of Christianity, the Crusades, and the Spanish Inquisition, all the way to the founding of present-day Israel and the Middle-East conflict.
"A sweeping chronology filled with excitement."
THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

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Dramatic, with movielike scenes. There's romance, intrigue, drama, action, bloodshed, etc....you name it, and it's probably there! Bravo Michener!

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User Review  - JP - Goodreads

Michener once again provides a journey of thousands of years in about a thousand pages. This story revolves around the excavation of Tell Makor, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Sea of Galilee ... Read full review

Contents

The Tell
1
The Bee Eater
77
Of Death and Life
113
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

James A. Michener was born on February 3, 1907 in Doylestown, Pa. He earned an A.B. from Swarthmore College, an A.M. from Colorado State College of Education, and an M.A. from Harvard University. He taught for many years and was an editor for Macmillan Publishing Company. His first book, "Tales of the South Pacific," derived from Michener's service in the Pacific in World War II, won the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and was the basis for the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway musical South Pacific, which won the 1950 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Michener completed close to 40 novels. Some other epic works include "Hawaii," "Centennial," "Space," and "Caribbean." He also wrote a significant amount of nonfiction including his autobiography "The World Is My Home." Among his many other honors, James Michener received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977. He was married to Patti Koon in 1935; they divorced in 1948. He married Vange Nord in 1948 (divorced 1955) and Mari Yoriko Sabusawa in 1955 (deceased 1994). He died in 1997 in Austin, Texas.

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