Brand Failures: The Truth about the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Time

Front Cover
Kogan Page Publishers, 2005 - Business & Economics - 260 pages
18 Reviews
Publisher's description: What do Coca-Cola, McDonalds, IBM, Microsoft and Virgin have in common? Yes, they are all global giants striding successfully across the world, but what they are less recognized for are all those branded products they've launched that have bombed--spectacularly and at great cost. Brand Failures is a riveting look at how such disasters occur. For the first time we're given the inside story of 100 major brand blunders that make for jaw-dropping reading. Matt Haig approaches his subject in a truly entertaining style 6 yes, this is a business book that is actually fun to read! But his message is deadly serious. He describes those brands that have set sail with the help of multi-million dollar advertising campaigns only to sink without trace. He also looks at acknowledged brand mistakes made by successful blue-chip companies and some lesser-known but hilarious bombshells. He reveals what went wrong in every case and provides for each a valuable checklist of lessons learnt, categorized as: classic failures; idea failures; extension failures; PR failures; culture failures; people failures; rebranding failures; Internet and new technology failures; tired brands. Companies live or die on the strength of their brand, and failure can be fatal. Don't let yours be consigned to the brand graveyard. A tour of Matt Haig's fascinating hall of failure will alert you to potential dangers and show you how to ensure a long, healthy life for your brand.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
2
3 stars
11
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: Brand Failures: The Truth about the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Time

User Review  - Saqib Khan - Goodreads

Great learning. Read full review

Review: Brand Failures: The Truth about the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Time

User Review  - Chris Eagle - Goodreads

So so examples of failures. Post mortems are insipid. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
3
III
5
IV
6
V
9
VI
10
VII
15
VIII
16
LVIII
127
LIX
129
LX
130
LXI
137
LXII
138
LXIV
139
LXVII
140
LXX
141

IX
23
X
27
XI
31
XII
32
XIII
35
XIV
40
XV
42
XVI
45
XVII
47
XVIII
48
XIX
50
XX
55
XXI
56
XXII
59
XXIII
60
XXV
61
XXVII
62
XXVIII
63
XXIX
65
XXX
70
XXXI
71
XXXII
76
XXXIII
79
XXXIV
83
XXXV
85
XXXVI
86
XXXVII
92
XXXVIII
94
XXXIX
95
XLI
96
XLIII
97
XLV
98
XLVII
99
XLVIII
101
XLIX
103
L
105
LI
110
LII
112
LIII
114
LIV
117
LV
119
LVI
121
LVII
123
LXXIII
142
LXXIV
145
LXXV
149
LXXVI
150
LXXVII
152
LXXVIII
153
LXXIX
156
LXXX
158
LXXXI
159
LXXXII
161
LXXXIII
165
LXXXIV
167
LXXXV
170
LXXXVI
174
LXXXVII
176
LXXXVIII
180
LXXXIX
181
XC
182
XCII
185
XCIII
188
XCIV
194
XCV
195
XCVI
197
XCVII
201
XCVIII
203
XCIX
204
C
206
CI
215
CII
219
CIII
222
CIV
224
CV
228
CVI
234
CVII
236
CVIII
238
CIX
241
CX
245
CXI
246
CXII
251
CXIII
253
CXIV
254
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2005)

Matt Haig is an acclaimed author and journalist. Some of Matt's Kogan Page titles include: E-PR: The Essential Guide to Public Relations on the Internet; Mobile Marketing: the Message Revolution; and The E-marketing Handbook. A regular contributor to the business press, Matt is also the author of the best-selling novel, The Last Family in England (Vintage).

Bibliographic information