The Portable Voltaire (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Jul 28, 1977 - Fiction - 576 pages
20 Reviews
Includes Part One of Candide; three stories; selections from The Philosophical Dictionary, The Lisbon Earthquake, and other works; and thirty-five letters.
  

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Review: The Portable Voltaire

User Review  - Robert Corrao - Goodreads

Great insights into one of the leaders of the Enlightement and a courageous critic of the religious aristocrats of the time. Read full review

Review: The Portable Voltaire

User Review  - Rtweneboah - Goodreads

Voltaire's 'Philosophical Dictionary' is one of my favorite reads and I personally enjoy 'Zadig' more than 'Candide', but it's nice to have many of his works in one book... So it's easy to refer to time and time again. Read full review

Contents

ABBE
ADULTERY
ANCIENTS AND MODERNS
ANNALS
ANTIQUITY
ARTS
ASS
ASTROLOGY
PREJUDICES RELIGIOUS
SEASON
RELIGION
SECT
SELFLOVE
SOCRATES
STATES GOVERNMENT
SUPERSTITION

ATOMS
AUTHORS
BABEL
BANKRUPTCY
BEAUTY
BEES
BISHOP
BOOKS
CHARACTER
CLIMATE
CONCATENATION OF EVENTS
DEMOCRACY
DESTINY
DOG
THE ECCLESIASTICAL MINISTRY
EQUALITY
EXPIATION
FAITH
FATHERLAND
FREE WILL
FRIENDSHIP
GOVERNMENT
INTOLERANCE
KISSING
LAWS
LENT
LIBERTY
LIBERTY OF THE PRESS
LOVE
LOVE OF GOD
MAN GENERAL REFLECTION ON
MEN OF LETTERS
MOHAMMEDANS
MOUNTAIN
NATURAL LAW
NATURE
NEW NOVELTIES
POWER OMNIPOTENCE
PRAYERS
PREJUDICES
PREJUDICES OF THE SENSES
THEIST
TOLERANCE
TRUTH
TYRANNY
Paris 26th August 1736
Leiden January 1737
17th April 1737
Cirey 27th May 1737
Cirey October 1737
Cirey 18th October 1738
12th August 1739
Paris 15th October 1749
13th November 1772
8th November 1776
Parts Ist April 1778
TO THE MINISTER FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PARIS
TO A FIRST COMMISSIONER
TO M MARTIN SAHLE
TO MME DE FONTAINE21
TO MME DENIS
TO M BAGIEU25
TO MME DENIS
TO MME DENIS
TO MME DENIS
TO MME DU DEFFAND
TO MME DU DEFFAND
TO J J ROUSSEAU
TO M TRONCHIN OF LYONS
TO MME DU DEFFAND
TO M DAMILAVILLE
TO LORD CHESTERFIELD
TO M DE FARGÈS33
The English Constitution
English Commerce
Inoculation
Chancellor Bacon
Locke
Suicide
Authors Preface
The Lisbon Earthquake44
Copyright

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About the author (1977)

François-Marie Arouet, writing under the pseudonym Voltaire, was born in 1694 into a Parisian bourgeois family. Educated by Jesuits, he was an excellent pupil but one quickly enraged by dogma. An early rift with his father—who wished him to study law—led to his choice of letters as a career. Insinuating himself into court circles, he became notorious for lampoons on leading notables and was twice imprisoned in the Bastille.

By his mid-thirties his literary activities precipitated a four-year exile in England where he won the praise of Swift and Pope for his political tracts. His publication, three years later in France, of Lettres philosophiques sur les Anglais (1733)—an attack on French Church and State—forced him to flee again. For twenty years Voltaire lived chiefly away from Paris. In this, his most prolific period, he wrote such satirical tales as “Zadig” (1747) and “Candide” (1759). His old age at Ferney, outside Geneva, was made bright by his adopted daughter, “Belle et Bonne,” and marked by his intercessions in behalf of victims of political injustice. Sharp-witted and lean in his white wig, impatient with all appropriate rituals, he died in Paris in 1778—the foremost French author of his day.

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