Handbook of Families and Poverty (Google eBook)

Front Cover
D. Russell Crane, Tim B. Heaton
SAGE, 2008 - Family & Relationships - 495 pages
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"Edited by two well-known family researchers at Brigham Young University, this meticulously researched compendium is a trove of useful information on areas where poverty and family issues intersect. This volume should be the first stop for anyone beginning research on poverty and families."
—CHOICE


The Handbook of Families and Poverty covers hotly debated issues associated with public policy and funded research as they relate to families and poverty. Contributors, bringing multiple perspectives to bear, aim to show alternatives to welfare in subgroups facing specific challenges that are currently not adequately addressed by the welfare system. Readers will appreciate the insightful summaries of research involving poverty and its relationship to couple, marital, and family dynamics.

Key Features:

  • Provides a comprehensive view of the issues surrounding families and poverty so that readers may benefit from the findings and insights of their peers in other relevant fields, with the hope that better understanding will bring better solutions.
  • Includes several chapters on application/intervention and theoretical issues
  • Contains writings by contributing authors who are respected experts from a broad range of disciplines and perspectives, including business; child development; family studies; psychology; public policy; social work; and sociology.
  

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Contents

Evaluating State Efforts to Reform
2
Social Policy and Marriage
22
The New Hope Program
32
Who Will Care When Parents Cant? An Overview of Trends in Kinship
48
POVERTY AMONG DIVERSE
63
An Opportunity to Enhance
82
Historical Issues
104
Minority and Immigrant Families
119
Incarceration Poverty and Families
269
Childrens Time Use and Parental Involvement in LowIncome Families
288
Cognitive and Emotional Outcomes for Children in Poverty
311
Challenging Social Inequalities in Health
334
INTERVENTION AND EDUCATION
349
A Family Resource?
365
Poor Fathers Involvement in the Lives of Their Children
381
The HealthCare Safety Net for MexicanOrigin Families
395

Processes of Poverty and Social Exclusion in Poor Families
144
Mexican American Families and Poverty
161
Social Support
181
Chronic Challenges Faced
198
How Economically Disadvantaged Are American Elderly
220
The Effect of Socioeconomic Status on the Community Functioning
239
A Prairie Sighting of Califanos Elephant
254
Federal Policy Efforts to Improve Outcomes Among Disadvantaged
411
Building WellBeing Among Poor U S Families
426
Toward a Multilevel
442
Increasing Marriage Would Dramatically Reduce Child Poverty
457
Index
471
About the Contributors
484
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Dr. Crane is a Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy in the School of Family Life at Brigham Young University. He has written one sole author text, Fundamentals of Marital Therapy (1996) published by Taylor Francis (Brunner/Mazel), co-edited another Handbook of Families and Health: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Sage, 2006), and over fifty referred journal articles and book chapters. His work has as appeared in leading scholarly journals including Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, Journal of Marriage and Family, Journal of Family Issues, Family Relations, American Journal of Family Therapy, Family Process, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry. Families, Systems and Health, Contemporary Family Therapy and Family Therapy. He has recently completed a six year term (2000-2006) as the Director of the Families Studies Center and Associate Director for Research in the School of Family life at Brigham Young University. In addition, he has completed a six year term (2000-2006; 2006 as Chair) as a member of the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

Dr. Heaton is a Professor in the Department of Sociology and Associate Director of the Family Studies Center at Brigham Young University. His major research focuses on the relationship between family characteristics on children’s health in Latin America. In addition to analysis of the extensive data provided by the demographic and health surveys, he has helped collect data on mothers with children under age 5 in Bolivia and Colombia. He also continues to be interested in family demographics. Current work focuses on the divorce generation—the cohort married in the late 1960s and 1970 which experienced unprecedented divorce rates. Now half of this cohort has experienced marital disruption. He has authored over 100 articles and chapters, and authored or edited 11 books.

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