Handbook of Birds of the Western United States: Including the Great Plains, Great Basin, Pacific Slope, and Lower Rio Grande Valley (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin, 1921 - Aves - Estados Unidos - 590 pages
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Page 398 - uttering his sweet ditty continually as he skips through the bushes in search of his morning repast ; or having satisfied his appetite, he mounts to the top of some tree in the neighborhood of his nest, and repeats at regular intervals a song of remarkable fullness for a bird of such minute proportions. . . . No bird with which I am acquainted conceals its nest more effectually than this warbler. This is placed at the base of a tussock of grass among the oak bushes, being sunk in a hollow scratched...
Page 181 - At nightfall they begin their rounds, inspecting the vicinity of farm houses, barns and corncribs, making trips through the orchard and nurseries, gliding silently across the meadows or encircling the stacks of grain in search of mice and insects. Thousands upon thousands of mice of different kinds thus fall victims to their industry. Their economic relations, therefore, are of the greatest importance, particularly on account of the abundance of the species in many of the farming districts, and whoever...
Page 187 - Scolopacidse (wing more than 250 (251-308) mm.) with the long, slender, and distinctly arched or dccurved bill longer than tarsus and middle toe, more than half as long as wing; tarsus more than twice as long as middle toe without claw, and tail shorter than tarsus and middle toe. Bill very long, slender, strongly and regularly decurved from, or posterior to, middle portion, the exposed culmen longer than tarsus and middle toe, longer than tail, more than half as long as wing, narrower than deep...
Page 321 - May, while the ground is still largely covered with snow, and by the middle of that month are common. "The males, as if conscious of their handsome plumage, choose the tops of the only breaks in the monotonous level, which are small, rounded knolls and tussocks. The male utters its song as it flies upward from one of these knolls, and when it reaches the height of ten or fifteen yards, it extends the points of its wings upwards, forming a large V-shaped figure, and floats gently to the ground, uttering,...
Page 241 - As he goes up and down he utters all the while a penetrating scream ka-quee'-ka-quee'-ka-quee'-kayuee'-ka-quee' , the emphasis being given each time at the top of the ascending line. Frequently when he is passing along with the even flight of a sober-minded crow and you are quietly admiring the salmon lining of his wings, he shoots rattling into the air, and as you...
Page xxxiv - The northward distribution of terrestrial animals and plants is governed by the sum of the positive temperatures for the entire season of growth and reproduction, and the southward distribution is governed by the mean temperature of a brief period during the hottest part of the year.
Page 277 - In estimating the economic status of the crow it must be acknowledged that he does some damage, but, on the other hand, he should receive much credit for the insects which he destroys. In the more thickly settled parts of the country the crow probably does more good than harm, at least when ordinary precautions are taken to protect young poultry and newly planted corn against his depredations.
Page 419 - Similar to the spring and summer livery, but plumage softer, and sides of throat and chest more grayish. Young female in first autumn. Similar to the adult female of corresponding season, but pileum and hindneck nearly concolor with back, etc., instead of grayish; chin, throat, and chest yellowish instead of pale gray or grayish white; marks on eyelids dull pale, yellowish, and an indistinct...
Page 328 - The entire weed seed element, including the seeds of such grasses as are troublesome on the farm (7 per cent of the total food), amounts to about one-fourth of the food. " The Grasshopper Sparrow in particular, and the other species of the genus Ammodramus in general, feed much less on vegetable matter than most other sparrows. Insects form their staple diet, and of these, beetles, grasshoppers, and caterpillars are the most important. As a destroyer of insect pests the Grasshopper Sparrow is most...
Page 132 - During the months of April and May the Sage Cocks are usually found in small flocks of a half dozen or more, stalking about with tails erect and spread after the manner of the strutting Turkey cock...

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