Springs of Scientific Creativity: Essays on Founders of Modern Science (Google eBook)

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Rutherford Aris, Howard Ted Davis, Roger H. Stuewer
U of Minnesota Press, 1983 - Science - 342 pages
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Mathematician Henri Poincaré was boarding a bus when he realized that the transformations of non-Euclidean geometry were just those he needed in his research on the theory of functions. He did not have to interrupt his conversation, still less to verify the equation in detail; his insight was complete at that point. Poincaré's insight into his own creativity -- his awareness that preliminary cogitation and the working of the subconscious had prepared his mind for an intuitive flash of recognition -- is just one of many possible analyses of scientific creativity, a subject as fascinating as it is elusive. The authors of this book have chosen to search for the springs of scientific creativity by examining the lives and work of a dozen innovative thinkers in the fields of mathematics, physics, and chemistry from the seventeenth down to the mid-twentieth century.
  

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Contents

Chapter 1 Galileo and Early Experimentation
3
Chapter 2 Newtons Development of the Principia
21
Chapter 3 The Origins and Consequences of Certain of J P Joules Scientific Ideas
44
Chapter 4 Maxwells Scientific Creativity
71
Chapter 5 The Scientific Style of Josiah Willard Gibbs
142
Chapter 6 Principal Scientific Contributions of John William Strutt Third Baron Rayleigh
163
A Comparison of Creative Styles
188
Chapter 8 Walther Nernst and the Application of Physics to Chemistry
203
The Case of Special Relativity
232
Chapter 10 Erwin Schrödinger and the Descriptive Tradition
254
Chapter 11 Michael Polanyis Creativity in Chemistry
279
Chapter 12 The Role of John von Neumann in the Computer Field
308
Contributors
329
Index
331
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