Handbook of International Law (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 1, 2010 - Law
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To the new student of international law, the subject can appear extremely complex: a system of laws created by states, international courts and tribunals operating at the national and global level. A clear guide to the subject is essential to ensure understanding. This handbook provides exactly that: written by an expert who both teaches and practises in the field, it focuses on what the law is; how it is created; and how it is applied to solve day-to-day problems. It offers a practical approach to the subject, giving it relevance and immediacy. The new edition retains a concise, user-friendly format allowing central principles such as jurisdiction and the law of treaties to be understood. In addition, it explores more specialised topics such as human rights, terrorism and the environment. This handbook is the ideal introduction for students new to international law.
  

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Contents

1 International law
1
2 States and recognition
15
3 Territory
33
4 Jurisdiction
42
5 The law of treaties
49
6 Diplomatic privileges and immunities
108
7 State immunity
145
8 Nationality aliens and refugees
163
14 Terrorism
264
15 The law of the sea
278
16 International environmental law
303
17 International civil aviation
319
18 Special regimes
327
19 International economic law
344
20 Succession of States
361
21 State responsibility
376

9 International organisations
178
10 The United Nations including the use of force
186
11 Human rights
215
12 The law of armed conflict international humanitarian law
235
13 International criminal law
245
22 Settlement of disputes
396
23 The European Union
430
Index
449
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

With a background including 35 years as a legal adviser to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Anthony Aust is a consultant with the law firm of Edwards Angell Palmer and Dodge and a visiting professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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