The First Buckinghamshire Battalion, 1914-1919 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Hazell, Watson & Viney, 1920 - World War, 1914-1918 - 216 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 187 - SIR, I am commanded by the Army Council to inform you that...
Page 187 - ... same, and to inform you that the medal will be forwarded to you forthwith by registered post. I am at the same time to request that you will be good enough to furnish a formal receipt at your earliest convenience. I am, Sir, Your obedient Servant, HJ CREEDY.
Page 98 - The breadth of the Piave on the front of attack was approximately one and a half miles, and consisted of numerous channels dotted with islands. The main island was the Grave di Papadopoli, which was some three miles long by one mile broad. The current varied according to the channels. In the main channel it ran at a rate exceeding ten miles an hour in time of flood, and never dropped below three and a half miles an hour at summer level. Hiding the British " The enemy held the Grave di Papadopoli...
Page 187 - Fusiliers. Royal Artillery Mess, Woolwich. Royal Engineer Mess, Chatham. Honourable Artillery Company. Royal Army Medical Corps Mess, Millbank Hospital. I am accordingly to transmit herewith a copy of the diploma which accompanied the medals, together with a translation of...
Page 187 - Cavan, have selected the following units to receive these medals, as representatives of the British Military Forces which were engaged on the Italian Front : Northamptonshire Yeomanry. Bucks Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. 1st Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers.
Page 188 - III, as Supreme Head of the Army and Navy, a large medal in gold, in memory of the War fought in the cause of Freedom and Civilization, presented this medal to the August Sovereign on the 10th December, 1919. The National Committee has also offered a facsimile of the medal to all the Ships...
Page 71 - ... serious inroad made by American competition and the long series of bad seasons have made the position of the poorer English farmer far from enviable, and unless a radical change for the better is soon made in agricultural prospects thousands of farmers can see no hope for tbe future but in emigration.
Page 36 - Courses of all kinds were arranged by the higher authorities, in particular for the training of junior officers as company commanders and for NCO's.
Page 187 - National Committee in commemoration of the War. Four others, it is understood, have been allotted to the Navy, and one to the Royal Air Force. The Council, after consultation with Lieutenant-General the Earl...
Page 36 - Physical rest was a necessity, and it was only by adequate periods of relaxation in rest billets that the troops could recover from the heavy moral strain and nerve themselves for the next effort.

Bibliographic information