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Books Books 1 - 10 of 43 on Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely,....  
" Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs. If the reader has never paid attention to this matter, he will be both interested and astonished to learn how many different local bodily feelings... "
The Principles of Psychology - Page 450
by William James - 1918 - 704 pages
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Mind, Volume 9

George Croom Robertson, George Frederick Stout - Electronic journals - 1884
...instigating cause is apt to be rather " hollow ". The next thing to be noticed is this, that every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt,...characteristic of his various emotional moods. It woul& be perhaps too much to expect him to arrest the tide of any strong gust of passion for the sake...
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The Monist, Volume 3

Paul Carus - Philosophy - 1893
...however slight, may make reverberate. . . . ' ' The next thing to be noticed is this, that n'ery one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT, acutely or obscurely, the moment it oecurs. . . . " I now proceed to urge the vital point of my whole theory, which is this: If ioe fancy...
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Psychology

William James - Psychology - 1893 - 478 pages
...or 'ifacunly, the mr/mtnt it oceurt. If the reader has never paid attention to this matter, he wffl be both interested and astonished to learn how many different local bodily filings he can detect in himself as characteristic of his various emotional moods. It would be perhaps...
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Mental Physiology: Especially in Its Relations to Mental Disorders

Theophilus Bulkeley Hyslop - Brain - 1895 - 552 pages
...fact, ami that our feelini/ of the same chanyes as they occur is the emotion. Further, " every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt. acutely or obscurely, the moment it occurs. . . If we fancy some strong emotion, and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all the feelings...
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Mental Physiology: Especially in Its Relations to Mental Disorders

Theophilus Bulkeley Hyslop - Brain - 1895 - 552 pages
...exciting fact, and that our feeling of Hie same chawjes as they occur is the emotion. Further, " every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt, acutely or obscurely, the moment ifc occurs. . . If we fancy some strong emotion, and then try to abstract from our consciousness of...
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Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Volume 66

Electronic journals - 1900
...exciting fact, and tliat our feeling of the same changes as they occur is the emotion."* " Every me of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT,...as characteristic of his various emotional moods, "t " If we fancy some strong emotion and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all the...
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Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Volume 66

Electronic journals - 1900
...exciting fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur is the emotion."* " Every ene of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT,...himself as characteristic of his various emotional moods."t " If we fancy some strong emotion and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it...
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Logic, Inductive and Deductive: An Introduction to Scientific Method

Adam Leroy Jones - Logic - 1909 - 304 pages
...state, and it has a purely bodily cause. " 8. The next thing to be noticed is this, that every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is FELT,...interested and astonished to learn how many different bodily feelings he can detect in himself as characteristic of his various emotional moods. It would...
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The Psychology of Religious Sects: Comparison of Types

Henry Clay McComas - Psychology, Religious - 1912 - 235 pages
...and that a cold and . neutral state of intellectual perception is all that remains. . . . Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt acutely or obscurely the moment it occurs. . . . What kind of emotion of fear would be left if the feeling neither of quickened heart-beats, nor...
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The elements of psychology

David R. Major - Psychology - 1913 - 413 pages
...whose effects in consciousness are the emotions of fear, anger, dread, or what not. (3) "Every one of the bodily changes, whatsoever it be, is felt acutely or obscurely the moment it occurs. . . . Thus a contraction of the eyes and brows, often inconsiderable, is felt when one is worried by...
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