Archaeologia cambrensis (Google eBook)

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W. Pickering, 1898 - Wales
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Page 314 - Mabinogion, is how evidently the mediaeval story-teller is pillaging an antiquity of which he does not fully possess the secret; he is like a peasant building his hut on the site of Halicarnassus or Ephesus; he builds, but what he builds is full of materials of which he knows not the history, or knows by a glimmering tradition merely; stones 'not of this building,' but of an older architecture, greater, cunninger, more majestical.
Page 336 - He used to know by studying the heavens [ie using the sky]), the period which would be the fine weather and the bad weather, and when each of these two times would change. Inde Scoti et Brittones eum deum vocaverunt maris, et inde filium maris esse dixerunt, ie mac lir,
Page 266 - We being authorised by Parliament to view and consider what Garrisons and Places of Strength are fit to be demolished; and we finding that the Castle of Haverford is not tenable for the services of the State, and yet that it may be possessed by...
Page 275 - ... the sin of lust, which is fouler than any other, by putting away thy wife, and after her honourable death, by the base practices of thy shameless daughter? Waste not (I beseech thee) the residue of thy life in offending God, because as yet an acceptable time and day of salvation shines on the faces of the penitent, wherein thou mayest take care that thy flight may not be in the winter, or on the sabbath day. "Turn away (according to the Psalmist) from evil, and do good, seek peace and ensue it...
Page 274 - ... and from the bottom even to the top art stained with murder and adulteries, thou naughty son of a good King, like Manasses sprung from Ezechiah, Vortipore, thou foolish tyrant of the Demetians, why art thou so stiff? What ! do not such violent gulfs of sin (which thou dost swallow up like pleasant wine, nay, rather which swallow thee up), as yet satisfy thee, especially since the end of thy life is daily now approaching ? Why dost thou heavily clog thy miserable soul with the sin of lust, which...
Page 3 - Britain for ever, before and after judgment. Farewell brothers and sisters, I cannot dwell here any longer, on account of the son of this nun ; because to him is delivered the monarchy over all the men of this island ; it is necessary for me to go to some other island, and leave all Britain to this child.
Page 405 - ... Charters of Burghs and illustrative Extracts from contemporary local Records will be given, as far as may be considered desirable. The Extracts from the Records of each Burgh will, as far as the Committee consider expedient, be issued separately, and without adhering to any prescribed order.
Page 406 - At the Meetings of the Society or of the Council the Chair shall be taken by the President, or, in his absence, by the Senior Vice-President, the Treasurer, or Senior Ordinary Members of the Council then present.
Page 314 - ... the mediaeval story-teller is pillaging an antiquity of which he does not fully possess the secret ; he is like a peasant building his hut on the site of Halicarnassus or Ephesus ; he builds, but what he builds is full of materials of which he knows not the history, or knows by a glimmering tradition merely ; stones " not of this building," but of an older architecture, greater, cunninger, more majestical.
Page 314 - This argument is founded on the topography of the country. It is found that Saxon names of places are very frequently definitions of the nature of the locality to which they are attached, as Clifton, Deepden, Bridge-ford, Thorpe, Ham, Wick, and the like ; whereas those of Wales are more frequently commemorative of some event, real or supposed, said to have happened on or near the spot, or bearing allusion to some person renowned in the story of the country or district. Such are " Llyn y Morwynion,"...

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