Social Structure & Person (Google eBook)

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Simon and Schuster, May 11, 2010 - Social Science - 376 pages
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A Collection of essays which studies the theoretical problem of relationships between social structure and personality, and how these different relationships merit distinct treatment for particular purposes.  Parsons concludes that in the larger picture, their interdependencies are so intimate that bringing them together in an interpretive synthesis is imperative if a balanced understanding of the complex as a whole is to be attained.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
part ONE THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES
15
analytic and Sociological Theory
34
The Incest Taboo in Relation to Social Structure and
57
Freuds
78
Some Reflections on the Problem of Psychosomatic Rela
112
PART TWO STAGES OF THE LIFE CYCLE
127
White
183
Toward a Healthy Maturity
236
PART THREE HEALTH AND ILLNESS
255
The Role of
292
Some Theoretical Considerations Bearing on the Field
325
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF TALCOTT PARSONS
359
INDEX
371
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About the author (2010)

Talcott Parsons, an American sociologist, introduced Max Weber to American sociology and became himself the leading theorist of American sociology after World War II. His Structure of Social Action (1937) is a detailed comparison of Alfred Marshall, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Vilfredo Pareto. Parsons concluded that these four scholars, coming from contrasting backgrounds and from four different countries, converged, without their knowing of the others, on a common theoretical and methodological position that he called "the voluntaristic theory of action." Subsequently, Parsons worked closely with the anthropologists Clyde Kluckhohn, Elton Mayo, and W. Lloyd Warner, and the psychologists Gordon W. Allport and Henry A. Murray, to define social, cultural, and personality systems as the three main interpenetrative types of action organization. He is widely known for his use of four pattern variables for characterizing social relationships:affectivity versus neutrality, diffuseness versus specificity, particularism versus universalism, and ascription versus achievement.

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