Extending the Frontiers: Essays on the New Transatlantic Slave Trade Database (Google eBook)

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David Eltis, David Richardson
Yale University Press, Oct 7, 2008 - History - 377 pages
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"The essays in this book provide statistical analysis of the transatlantic slave trade, focusing especially on Brazil and Portugal, from the 17th through the 19th century. It contains the most up-to-date and comprehensive research on slave ship voyages, origins, destinations, numbers of slaves per port, country, year, and period. In 1999 the same authors published The Transatlantic Slave Trade Dataset (Cambridge, book and CD), but it did not include data on Brazil and Central America, which this book fills in"--Provided by the publisher.
  

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Contents

1 A New Assessment of the Transatlantic Slave Trade
1
Origins and Destinations
61
National Slave Trades
203
Some Wider Consequences and Implications of the New Data
273
List of Contributors
365
Index
367
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

David Eltis is Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History at Emory University and has held visiting appointments at Harvard and Yale universities. He is author of The Rise of African Slavery in the Americas, co-compiler of The Transatlantic Slave Trade: A Database on CD-ROM and its successor on www.slavevoyages.org co-editor of Extending the Frontiers: Essays on the New Transatlantic Slave Trade Database (with David Richardson), co-editor of Slavery in the Development of the Americas (with Frank Lewis and Kenneth Sokoloff), and editor of Coerced and Free Migrations: Global Perspectives. He is also author and co-author of numerous articles on slavery, migration, and abolition, most recently in the American Historical Review and the William and Mary Quarterly.

David Eltis is Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History, Emory University. He lives in Atlanta. David Richardson is director, Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation, and professor of economic history, University of Hull, England. He lives in East Yorkshire.

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