Memorial of the Late James L. Petigru: Proceedings of the Bar of Charleston, S.C., March 25, 1863 (Google eBook)

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Walker, Evans & Cogswell, 1880 - 57 pages
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Page 53 - ... an advocate, by the sacred duty which he owes his client, knows in the discharge of that office but one person in the world, that client and none other. To save that client by all expedient means, to protect that client at all hazards and costs, to all others, and among others to himself, is the highest and most unquestioned of his duties...
Page 53 - ... to all others, and among others to himself, is the highest and most unquestioned of his duties ; and he must not regard the alarm, the suffering, the torment, the destruction which he may bring upon any other. Nay, separating even the duties of a patriot from those of an advocate, and casting them, if need be, to the wind, he must go on reckless of the consequences, if his fate it should unhappily be to involve his country in confusion for his client's sake...
Page 42 - His legs bestrid the ocean : his rear'd arm Crested the world : his voice was propertied As all the tuned spheres, and that to friends ; But when he meant to quail and shake the orb, He was as rattling thunder. For his bounty, There was no winter in't; an autumn 'twas That grew the more by reaping...
Page 17 - And that which should accompany old age, As honor, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud, but deep, mouth-honor, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Page 53 - To save that client by all expedient means, to protect that client at all hazards and costs to all others, and among others to himself, is the highest and most unquestioned of his duties; and he must not regard the alarm, the suffering, the torment, the destruction which he may bring upon any other.
Page 25 - My tutor in boyhood, my friend in early manhood, my better friend in advanced life, whom neither time nor fortune, private duties nor troubles, nor the angry contests and differences of more than thirty years, ever induced to say to me an unkind word or do an unkind deed.
Page 43 - Him ; and in that love one to another which suffereth long and is kind ; envieth not, vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil, rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the Truth, beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things, and never faileth.
Page 18 - That as a testimony of respect for the memory of the deceased, the members and officers of this House will wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days.
Page 47 - ... and commended his name to the great and good of all lands in the profession to which he devoted his life, this would indeed have been with him a crowning consolation, and his cup would have been full. This he had consciously to forego. He knew that the gate to power in the South — the only gate — was through the State. Through that door alone could he reach the country and the world and hope to win the large distinction worthy of his genius. He loved his people better than himself, and he...
Page 42 - ... How tender, considerate, and delicate in the bestowal of his favors! His benefits descended like the dews of night — in silence, without a witness, and were known only by their print and the voice of gratitude, which could not be silenced. The cry of distress was to him as the voice of God. He counted not the cost of his compassion ; whether his treasury was full or empty, he gave. He drew upon the future, when he had not, and made good his drafts by toil, often continued deep into the night,...

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