Indian Fairy Tales (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Joseph Jacobs
D. Nutt, 1892 - Children's stories - 255 pages
6 Reviews
A representative collection of fairy tales of India.
  

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Review: Indian Fairy Tales

User Review  - Justin - Goodreads

Its a quick lighthearted read. I'm curious on what is lost in translation without cultural context-- what were we suppose to take away when characters killed, stole and cheated without further ... Read full review

Review: Indian Fairy Tales

User Review  - Hannah - Goodreads

Again, how do you go about rating a collection of traditional folk and fairy tales? How does one rate the roots of culture? Read full review

Contents

I
xvii
II
3
III
17
IV
21
V
38
VI
40
VII
46
VIII
51
XV
112
XVI
115
XVII
127
XVIII
132
XIX
136
XX
152
XXI
156
XXII
179

IX
66
X
70
XI
85
XII
90
XIII
100
XIV
103
XXIII
186
XXIV
194
XXV
199
XXVI
218
XXVII
221
XXVIII
223

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Page 34 - that I am not as others. Far, far away, hundreds of thousands of miles from this, there lies a desolate country covered with thick jungle. In the midst of the jungle grows a circle of palm trees, and in the centre of the circle stand six chattees full of water, piled one above another: below the sixth chattee is a small cage which contains a little green parrot; on the life of the parrot depends my life; and if the parrot is killed I must die. It is, however...
Page 219 - Wind were greedy and selfish. They enjoyed the great feast that had been prepared for them, without a thought of saving any of it to take home to their mother ; but the gentle Moon did not forget her. Of every dainty dish that was brought round she placed a small portion under one of her beautiful long finger-nails, that...
Page 28 - And when they got to their own land there was great rejoicing throughout the kingdom at the marriage of the seven young Princes to seven such beautiful Princesses. About a year after this Balna had a little son, and his uncles and aunts were so fond of the boy that it was as if he had seven fathers and seven mothers. None of the other Princes and Princesses had any children, so the son of the seventh Prince and Balna was acknowledged their heir by all the rest. They had thus lived very happily for...
Page 17 - But to all of them Lambikin replied, with a little frisk: "To granny's house I go, Where I shall fatter grow, Then you can eat me so.
Page 37 - The prince pulled off the parrot's second wing, and the magician's left arm tumbled off. " Give me my parrot ! " cried he, and fell on his knees. The prince pulled off the parrot's right leg the magician's right leg fell off; the prince pulled off the parrot's left leg down fell the magician's left. Nothing remained of him save the limbless body and the head; but still he rolled his eyes, and cried, " Give me my parrot ! "
Page 19 - Then they all sighed to think of the tender little morsel they had let slip. At last the Jackal came limping along, for all his sorry looks as sharp as a needle, and he too called out " Drumikin ! Drumikin ! Have you seen Lambikin...
Page 219 - Mother, fetch a plate ; see what I have brought you ;" and shaking her hands, she showered down such a choice dinner as never was seen before. Then the Star turned to the Sun, and spoke thus : " Because you went out to amuse yourself with your friends, and feasted and enjoyed yourself without any thought of your mother at home, you shall be cursed. Henceforth your rays shall ever be hot and scorching, and shall burn all that they touch. All men shall hate you, and cover their heads when you appear...
Page 23 - The Raja then saw the Prudhan's widow go to the place where all his dinner was nicely prepared, and, as she took the wood, she threw a little mud into each of the dishes. At this he was very angry, and sent to have the woman seized and brought before him. But when the widow came, she told him that she had played this trick because she wanted to gain an audience with him; and she spoke so cleverly, and pleased him so well with her cunning words, that instead of punishing her, the Raja married her,...
Page 26 - Next day while the Princesses were eating the cream cake, who should come by but their step-mother's daughter. Balna saw her first, and said, " See, sisters, there comes that girl again. Let us sit round the edge of the tank, and not allow her to see it; for if we give her some of our cake, she will go and tell her mother, and that will be very unfortunate for us." The other sisters, however, thought Balna unnecessarily suspicious, and instead of following her advice, they gave the Purdan's daughter...
Page 32 - So he told his story to the Malee's wife, and begged her to help him to remain in that place awhile and inquire further concerning the unhappy people she mentioned ; and she promised to befriend him, and advised his disguising himself lest the magician should see him, and turn him likewise into stone. To this the prince agreed. So the Malee's wife dressed him up in a saree, and pretended that he was her daughter. One day, not long after this, as the magician was walking in his garden he saw the little...

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