The Makers of American Wine: A Record of Two Hundred Years (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, Apr 7, 2012 - Cooking - 311 pages
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Americans learned how to make wine successfully about two hundred years ago, after failing for more than two hundred years. Thomas Pinney takes an engaging approach to the history of American wine by telling its story through the lives of 13 people who played significant roles in building an industry that now extends to every state. While some names—such as Mondavi and Gallo—will be familiar, others are less well known. These include the wealthy Nicholas Longworth, who produced the first popular American wine; the German immigrant George Husmann, who championed the native Norton grape in Missouri and supplied rootstock to save French vineyards from phylloxera; Frank Schoonmaker, who championed the varietal concept over wines with misleading names; and Maynard Amerine, who helped make UC Davis a world-class winemaking school.
  

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Contents

A Man with a Mission
1
The Necessary Entrepreneur
22
A Pure and Lofty Faith
39
Putting California Wines on the Map
57
The Italians Are Coming
75
Wine as Big Business
90
American Wine for Americans
107
Creating New Markets
127
Applied Science
171
Zealot at Work
195
Aiming for the Top
215
Women Become Winemakers
236
Notes
255
Sources and Works Cited
289
Index
301
Copyright

A Master Teacher
149

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About the author (2012)

Thomas Pinney is Professor of English, Emeritus, at Pomona College. He is the author or editor of several books including the two-volume A History of Wine in America (UC Press). The second volume of this definitive wine history won the 2006 International Association of Culinary Professionals Award for best book on wine, beer, or spirits.

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