A History of Ireland. From the Earliest Period, to the Present Time: In a Series of Letters, Addressed to William Hamilton, Esq. By William Crawford, ... (Google eBook)

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John Bellew, 1783
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Page 282 - Britain; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Page 315 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton ; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...
Page 280 - Therefore for the better securing of the dependency of Ireland upon the Crown of Great Britain, May it please your most excellent Majesty that it may be declared, and be it declared . . . That the same kingdom of Ireland hath been, is, and of right ought to be subordinate unto and dependent upon the imperial Crown of Great Britain...
Page 281 - Ireland have not nor of right ought to have any jurisdiction to judge of, reverse, or affirm any judgment, sentence, or decree given or made in any court within the said kingdom ; and that all proceedings before the said House of Lords upon any such judgment, sentence, or decree are and are hereby declared to be utterly null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.
Page 357 - That a claim of any body of men, other than the king, lords, and commons of Ireland to make laws to bind this kingdom, is unconstitutional, illegal, and a grievance.
Page 359 - That as men and as Irishmen, as Christians and as protestants, we rejoice in the relaxation of the penal laws against our Roman catholic fellow-subjects...
Page 315 - ... toleration inviolable. The civil and religious rights of my loving subjects are equally dear to me with the most valuable prerogatives of my crown; and as the surest foundation of the whole, and the best means to draw down the Divine favour on my reign, it is my fixed purpose to countenance and encourage the practice of true religion and virtue.
Page 357 - That the ports of this country are, by right, open to all foreign countries, not at war with the king, and that any burden thereupon, or obstruction thereto, save only by the parliament of Ireland, are unconstitutional, illegal, and a grievance...
Page 231 - That the subjects which are Protestants may have arms for their defence suitable to their conditions and as allowed by law. That election of members of parliament ought to be free. That the freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 325 - ... were guilty of flagrant acts of inhumanity. Some of them were taken and tried at Carrickfergus, but whether from want of evidence, from fear of incurring the resentment of the populace, or from partiality in the witnesses and the jury, they were acquitted. On this account the Legislature...

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