Venice and the Renaissance

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MIT Press, 1995 - Architecture - 296 pages
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"One of architecture's greatest living minds. . . . Tafuri's example has proved powerfully liberating for the historical imagination."
-- Herbert Muschamp, New York Times

"Tafuri is one of the most influential figures in architectural history of the Renaissance and modern periods today. . . . This is not simply a work about Venice's man-made physical environment, but an introduction to the Venetian Renaissance that is likely to be relevant to the work of any scholar concerned with the culture of that time."
-- James Ackerman, "Renaissance Quarterly" Pursuing the intersections of Venetian culture from the beginning of the sixteenth century through the first decades of the seventeenth, Manfredo Tafuri develops a story crowded with characters and full of surprises. He engages the doges Andrea Gritti and Leonardo Dona; architects and artists Sansovino, Serlio, Palladio, and Scamozzi; and scientists Francesco Barozzi and Galileo. He records the battle that was fought for architecture as metaphor for absolute truth and good government, and contrasts these with the myths that inspired them.

  

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Contents

a Shapeless Little Island with
139
Republican pefas Neo Renewal and Crisis The Debate
161
urbis 15
236
Glossary
281
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Jessica Levine is a writer and translator living in New York City. She has previously translated two works by Manfredo Tafuri, History of Italian Architecture, 1944-1985 and Venice and the Renaissance.

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