Following Gandalf: Epic Battles and Moral Victory in the Lord of the Rings

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Brazos Press, 2003 - Fiction - 234 pages
5 Reviews
While the success of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings is remarkable, it's certainly no mystery. In a culture where truth is relative and morality is viewed as "old-fashioned," we eagerly welcome the message of these tales: we have free will, our choices matter, and truth can be known. Matthew Dickerson investigates the importance of free will and moral choices in Tolkien's Middle Earth, where moral victory, rather than military success, is the "real" story. He explores Christian themes throughout, including salvation, grace, and judgment. Following Gandalf will delight veteran Tolkien fans and offer new fans an impressive introduction to his major works. Engaging and theologically thought-provoking, it will interest pastors, students, seminarians, and layreaders.

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Review: Following Gandalf: Epic Battles and Moral Victory in The Lord of the Rings

User Review  - Leah Nichols - Goodreads

It was really good! It helped me to understand the world of Tolkien. Read full review

Review: Following Gandalf: Epic Battles and Moral Victory in The Lord of the Rings

User Review  - Ryan - Goodreads

Very good read. I was pretty skeptical about it but turned out to be pretty good. Read full review

Contents

Epic Battles
19
The Wise of MiddleEarth
47
Military Victory or Moral Victory?
67
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Matthew T. Dickerson is professor of environmental studies and computer science at Middlebury College, author of "Ents, Elves, and Eriador: The Environmental Vision of J. R. R. Tolkien,"
"Following Gandalf: Epic Battles and Moral Victory in The Lord of the Rings "and" The Finnsburg Encounter,""" and coeditor of "From Homer to Harry Potter: A Handbook on Myth and Fantasy,"""
""
David O'Hara is assistant professor of philosophy and instructor in classical Greek at Augustana College in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He is coeditor of "From Homer to Harry Potter: A Handbook on Myth and Fantasy,"""

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