The nursery rhymes of England, ed. by J.O. Halliwell (Google eBook)

Front Cover
James Orchard Halliwell- Phillipps
1846
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

What an extraordinary collection of work with all manner of asides as insight to life in earlier times. The historical references and background to the rhymes are fascinating. Wonderful to be able to browse through this treasure.
Magnificent and quaint! Christine Prescott. South Africa

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 43 - A MAN of words and not of deeds Is like a garden full of weeds...
Page 92 - OLD Mother Hubbard Went to the cupboard, To get her poor dog a bone: But when she got there The cupboard was bare, And so the poor dog had none.
Page 1 - Old King Cole Was a merry old soul, And a merry old soul was he: He called for his pipe, And he called for his bowl, And he called for his fiddlers three.
Page 15 - One, two, Buckle my shoe; Three, four, Shut the door; Five, six, Pick up sticks; Seven, eight, Lay them straight; Nine, ten, A good fat hen; Eleven, twelve, Who will delve?
Page 76 - As I was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks, Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kitsó Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were going to St. Ives?
Page 204 - Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn, The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn.
Page 69 - Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep, And can't tell where to find them; Leave them alone, and they'll come home, And bring their tails behind them.
Page 64 - THE NORTH WIND DOTH BLOW he north wind doth blow, And we shall have snow, And what will poor Robin do then, Poor thing? He'll sit in a barn, And keep himself warm, And hide his head under his wing, Poor thing.
Page 32 - OLD Mother Goose, when She wanted to wander, Would ride through the air On a very fine gander. Mother Goose had a house, 'Twas built in a wood, Where an owl at the door For sentinel stood.
Page 177 - THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT This is the farmer sowing his corn, That kept the cock that crowed in the morn, That waked the priest all shaven and shorn, That married the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog That worried the cat That killed the rat That ate the malt That lay in the house that Jack built.

Bibliographic information