The popular educator (Google eBook)

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Cassell, Petter, Galpin, 1852 - History
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This volume appears to have been published early in 1871 or in December of 1870--but not earlier. It is entirely unclear where the 1767 date tag came from.

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Page 355 - ... asked him why he did not worship the God of heaven. The old man told him that he worshipped the fire only, and acknowledged no other god. At which answer Abraham grew so zealously angry that he thrust the old man out of his tent, and exposed him to all the evils of the night and an unguarded condition. When the old man was gone, God called to Abraham, and asked him where the stranger was. He replied, 'I thrust him away because he did not worship thee.
Page 244 - If ye will fear the Lord, and serve him, and obey his voice, and not rebel against the commandment of the Lord; then shall both ye and also the king that reigneth over you continue following the Lord your God...
Page 46 - I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet...
Page 355 - God answered him, I have suffered him these hundred years, although he dishonoured me, and couldst thou not endure him one night, when he gave thee no trouble ? Upon this, saith the story, Abraham fetched him back again, and gave him hospitable entertainment and wise instruction.
Page 46 - ... it is that feigning notable images of virtues, vices, or what else, with that delightful teaching, which must be the right describing note to know a poet by.
Page 355 - At the sight of a cross or crucifix I can dispense with my hat, but scarce with the thought or memory of my Saviour. I cannot laugh at, but rather pity the fruitless journeys of pilgrims, or contemn the miserable condition of friars ; for, though misplaced in circumstances, there is something in it of devotion.
Page 178 - Sachentege was made thus: it was fastened to a beam, having a sharp iron to go round a man's throat and neck, so that he might no ways sit, nor lie, nor sleep, but that he must bear all the iron.
Page 319 - But hold some two days conference with the dead, From them I should learn somewhat I am sure I never shall know here. I'll tell thee a miracle ; I am not mad yet, to my cause of sorrow. Th...
Page 178 - ... could. If two or three men came riding to a town, all the township fled before them, and thought that they were robbers. The bishops, and clergy were ever cursing them, but this to them was nothing, for they were all accursed, and forsworn, and reprobate.
Page 296 - London, (the act of God, the queen's enemies, fire, and all and every other dangers and accidents of the seas, rivers, and navigation, of whatever nature and kind soever, excepted,) unto order or to assigns, he or they paying freight for the said goods at 51.

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