Cincinnati in 1826 (Google eBook)

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Morgan, Lodge, and Fisher, 1827 - Cincinnati (Ohio) - 100 pages
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Page 83 - It may be supposed, that the period is not remote, when many of the wealthy planters and professional gentlemen of the south, will have their summer villas within the environs of Cincinnati, and thoSe who may feel unwilling to be deprived of the services of their slaves, can still have the advantages of a city life, by locating themselves on the Kentucky shore, in the villages of Newport and Covington, both of which are healthy, and delightfully situated opposite to Cincinnati.
Page iii - The valley on which the city of Cincinnati, and the villages of Newport and Covington are built, is perhaps the most extensive and beautiful bordering on the Ohio river. The circumference of this plain is about 12 miles, and the hills, by which it is environed, intersect each other in such a manner as to form an imperfect square ; through the north-east and south-west angles of which the Ohio river enters and passes out.* The northern half of the valley is bounded on the west by Mill-creek; on the...
Page 56 - ... manufacturing achievements of a community hardly twenty-seven years old. By 1819 the variety of industries had considerably increased. Tinware factories, nail, furniture, and coach factories, along with those already established, produced $1,059,459 worth of goods and employed 1238 men. By 1826, the region of country, which extended and successful manufacturing establishments will make tributary to our city, like the amount of manufactured goods required by its wants, is almost unbounded. Our...
Page iii - ... area of that part of the valley on which Cincinnati stands, may be estimated at four square miles. It is unequally elevated, and the upper and lower tables have received the names of hill and bottom. The latter, gradually widening, stretches westwardly from the mouth of Deer-creek, where it is but 200 feet broad, to the interval lands of Mill-creek. Its medium breadth is about 800 feet. The hill rises about 50 feet above the bottom. The ascent, which is at first steep, soon becomes gradual, and...
Page 78 - Cincinnati for several years has been deficient in the amount of its disposable capital ; a nominal superfluity of it existed during the prosperity of the local banks ; after their destruction, paper currency was almost withdrawn from circulation and much of the metallic currency applied to the payments due the United States Bank and the eastern merchants. From this condition of things the city has been gradually recovering, but its citizens are not yet large capitalists. Although engaged in profitable...
Page 59 - The other Cincinnati plant, the Phoenix Paper Mill, received the following notice: During the past summer, a fine establishment for the manufacture of paper was erected under the superintendence of the Messrs. Grahams, on the river bank, in the western part of the city. When about to go into operation, in the month of December, it was entirely consumed by fire. The owners of it are now erecting upon its ruins another, to be called the Phoenix Paper Mill, which is 132 by 36 feet, exclusive of the...
Page 78 - Bunk and the Eastern merchants. From this condition of things the city has been gradually recovering, but its citizens are not yet large capitalists. Although engaged in profitable business, most of them have not the means of extending it to a scale proportioned to their enterprise and the resources of the place. Money is consequently in great demand, and a high price is willingly paid for its use. For small sums 36 per cent, per annum is frequently given, and for large ones from 10 to 20 per cent,...
Page iii - ... the west by Mill-creek; on the north by the river hills ; east by Deer-creek ; and south by the Ohio. The southern half is bisected by Licking river, on the Kentucky side, which, uniting its waters with those of the Ohio at right angles, separates the villages of Newport and Covington, in that state, leaving the former on the east, and the latter on the west side of its channel. " The area of that part of the valley on which Cincinnati stands, may be estimated at four square miles. It is unequally...
Page iii - The hills which surround this extensive valley, present to the eye of the beholder one continued ridge, irregularly elevated, and of diversified configurations. They exhibit, under no circumstances, an aspect of grandeur; but are always beautiful and picturesque. Their average elevation above the plain, is about three hundred feet : and, instead of the bold and rocky declivities, which characterize the free stone regions of the Ohio, they present gentle and varying slopes, which are mostly covered...

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