The Intellectual Observer, Volume 12 (Google eBook)

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Groombridge and Sons, 1868 - Science
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Page 42 - SOUND : a Course of Eight Lectures delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. By JOHN TYNDALL, LL.DFRS New Edition, crown 8vo. with Portrait of M. Chladni and 169 Woodcuts, price 9s. HEAT a MODE of MOTION.
Page 383 - Several writers have misapprehended or objected to the term Natural Selection. Some have even imagined that natural selection induces variability, whereas it implies only the preservation of such variations as arise and are beneficial to the being under its conditions of life.
Page 394 - The conclusions he had thus been able to arrive at are the following : — (1) That the surface of the chalk in the Valley of the Somme had assumed its present form prior to the deposition of any of the gravel or loess...
Page 382 - There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity...
Page 332 - I have seen the wild stone-avalanches of the Alps, which smoke and thunder down the declivities with a vehemence almost sufficient to stun the observer. I have also seen snow-flakes descending so softly as not to hurt the fragile spangles of which they were composed ; yet to produce, from aqueous...
Page 88 - We may infer from the facts above mentioned that the colouring matter of blood, like indigo, is capable of existing in two states of oxidation, distinguishable by a difference of colour and a fundamental difference i/i the action on the spectrum.
Page 404 - Capra hircus. The fourth skull belonged to the pig, and had a round hole in the frontals rather larger than a crown piece, which had the appearance of being made by human hands. The presence of the lower jaws with the skulls indicates that they were deposited in the cavern while the ligaments still bound them together. They were all more or less covered with decaying stalagmite. The outer chamber was remarkable for the absence of earth of any kind, except underneath the hole in the roof, where there...
Page 401 - AT the time man first appeared on the earth, the physical conditions obtaining in Western Europe were altogether different from those under which we now live. Britain formed part of the mainland of Europe, and low fertile plains, covered with the vegetation peculiar to a moderately severe climate, stretched far away into the Atlantic, from the present western coast line.* The Thames also, instead of flowing into the German ocean, joined the Elbe and the Rhine in an estuary, opening on the North Sea...
Page 179 - Kingdom, and for more effectually employing the Poor, by prohibiting the use and wear of all printed, painted, stained, or dyed Callicoes in Apparel, Household Stuff, Furniture or otherwise...
Page 406 - ... out of those thirty-one, all, with the exception of six, are still living in our island. The cave bear, cave lion, and cave hyaena had vanished away, along with a whole group of pachyderms, and of all the extinct animals but one, the Irish elk, still survived.

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