Memoirs and Correspondence of Viscount Castlereagh, Second Marquess of Londonderry: v. 1. The Irish Rebellion. v. 2 Arrangements for a union. v. 3. Completion of the legislative union. v. 4. Concessions to Catholics and dissenters. Emmett's insurrection (Google eBook)

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H. Colburn, 1851 - Great Britain
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Page 389 - All that I can say upon the subject is, that whether I am to command the army or not, or am to quit it, I shall do my best to insure its success ; and you may depend upon it that I shall not hurry the operations, or commence them one moment sooner than they ought to be commenced, in order that I may acquire the credit of the success.
Page 183 - That we are not, by the evacuation of Zealand, about to uncover Sweden to an attack from France, and, by letting a French army into Sweden, expose Russia to be menaced on the side of Finland. The tone of the Russian Cabinet has become much more conciliatory to us since they heard of your operations, partly, perhaps, from alarm for Cronstadt, partly from the natural respect that attaches to a vigorous exertion against that power which they may dread but must hate. The opinion of those best disposed...
Page 386 - ... detachments of different corps, and cannot in any respect be deemed an efficient force. Besides these, there are 300 Spanish infantry, about 1500 regular Portuguese infantry, and some militia volunteers and peasantry here. ' The corps of Spanish infantry, which had commenced its march from Galicia, as I informed you in my last letter, is not yet arrived. It was stopped on the frontier, because there were no orders at Braganza to allow it to enter the country...
Page 133 - ... combined operation of a force from Cork, added to that now on board the East India Company's ships at Falmouth. I have the satisfaction to acquaint you that His Majesty has been graciously pleased to select you for the command of this expedition, and that directions have been given to embark, with the utmost despatch, the regiments named in the margin, (24th, 38th, 71st, 72nd, 83rd, 93rd,) in transports now lying at Cork to be employed on this service.
Page 432 - The result of all these operations, which must, for the present, be distinct, would be to confine the French to their line of the Ebro for the present, and eventually to oblige them to retire upon their own frontier. Time would be gained for the further organization of the Spanish Government and force ; by the judicious and effectual employment of which the British Government would be enabled to withdraw its troops from Spain, to employ them in other parts of Europe. As for preventing the retreat...
Page 426 - England; or, if that should not be practicable, that I should remain without employment. You will hear from others of the various causes which I must have for being dissatisfied, not only with the military and other public measures of the Commander-in-Chief, but with his- treatment of myself. I am convinced it is better for him, for the army, and for me, that I should go away •> and the sooner I go the better.
Page 433 - Under these circumstances, I have told Sir Hew Dalrymple that I was not able to perform the duty in which you had desired I should be employed ; that I was not a topographical engineer, and could not pretend to describe in writing such a country as the Asturias...
Page 426 - It is quite impossible for me to continue any longer with this army, if Sir Hew Dalrymple should remain at the head of it ; and I wish, therefore, that you would allow me to return home, and resume the duties of my office, if I should still be in office, and it is convenient to the...
Page 431 - ... and issue forth into the plains, either by Leon or the pass of Reynosa. The army could then have a short, although probably a difficult communication with the sea, which must be carried on by mules, of which there are plenty in the country; it could co-operate with Blake's...
Page 144 - proceeds upon the principle that the true value of the Cape to Great Britain is its being considered and treated at all times as an outpost subservient to the protection and security of our Indian possessions. When in our hands it must afford considerable accommodation and facilities to our intercourse with those possessions, but its occupation is perhaps even more material as depriving the enemy of the best intermediate position between Europe and India for assembling a large European armament...

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