History of the Harvard Law School and of Early Legal Conditions in America (Google eBook)

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1908 - Education
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Warren, Charles. History of the Harvard Law School and of Early Legal Conditions in America. New York: Lewis Publishing Company, 1908. Three volumes. xiv, 543; iv, 560; 397 pp. Illustrated. Reprinted 1999 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 99-29193. ISBN 1-58477-006-6. Cloth. $275. * The definitive history. Warren provides a fascinating account of law studies, lawyers, legal practice and legal conditions in America from 1640 to 1817--the year of the foundation of the Harvard Law School. This is followed by a comprehensive history of the Harvard Law School from 1817 to 1908. Volume three contains a complete, detailed biographical Alumni Roll for the Harvard Law School, with selected class pictures and an alumni index. Marke, A Catalogue of the Law Collection of New York University (1953) 201. The set is also available in handsome quarter calf with raised bands, gilt-stamped lettering-pieces and gilt embellishments, over marble boards for $850.
  

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Contents

IV
7
V
31
VI
46
VII
72
VIII
117
IX
126
X
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XI
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XXX
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XXXI
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LVIII
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LIX
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Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1 - Reason is the life of the law, nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason...
Page 139 - In no country perhaps in the world is the law so general a study. The profession itself is numerous and powerful ; and in most provinces it takes the lead. The greater number of the deputies sent to the congress were lawyers. But all who read, and most do read, endeavor to obtain some smattering in that science.
Page 139 - I have been told by an eminent bookseller that in no branch of his business, after tracts of popular devotion, were so many books as those on the law exported to the Plantations. The colonists have now fallen into the way of printing them for their own use. I hear that they have sold nearly as many of Blackstone's " Commentaries
Page 78 - I thank God there are no free schools, nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years ; for learning has brought disobedience and heresy and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both...
Page 139 - This study renders men acute, inquisitive, dexterous, prompt in attack, ready in defence, full of resources. In other countries, the people, more simple, and of a less mercurial cast, judge of an ill principle in government only by an actual...
Page 34 - The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers. CADE. Nay, that I mean to do. Is not this a lamentable thing, that of the skin of an innocent lamb should be made parchment? That parchment, being scribbl'd o'er, should undo a man?
Page xiii - Such is the unity of all history that any one who endeavours to tell a piece of it must feel that his first sentence tears a seamless web.
Page 91 - The people of the State of New York, by the Grace of God, Free and Independent...

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About the author (1908)

Charles Warren is lecturer in the School of Geography and Geosciences at the University of St Andrews, Scotland.

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