Library Classification (Google eBook)

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Roberts bros., 1894 - Classification - 32 pages
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Page 9 - ... giving them the number of the preceding class with a letter added. The books in each class were supposed to be numbered consecutively. Subdivisions could be made as needed in any class by assigning blocks of numbers to a particular subject. The main point in all of this was that the librarian could feel free to change the numbers or the order of the classes as he or she best saw fit. Fletcher was also known as an indexer, primarily through his association with Poole's Index to Periodical Literature....
Page 14 - Islands. Sciences. 125. History and philosophy of the sciences. ,126. Scientific societies and academies. Periodicals. 127. Essays and miscellanies. 128. Evolution and cosmology. ,129. Natural history (works combining zoology, botany, etc.). .130. Biology and embryology. 131. Comparative anatomy and physiology. ,132. Zoology. .133. Lowest forms of animal life. 134. Mollusca. Insects. 135. Fishes. 136. Reptiles. 137. Birds. 138. Mammalia. 139. Man. Anthropology, ethnology, etc.
Page 3 - ... come to my attention was at Haverford College, Pennsylvania, where it was used until reclassification in 1923. William I. Fletcher, librarian of Amherst had published the first draft of a proposed classification scheme in the Library Journal as early as 1889. He stated that his scheme was designed: To offer a way of escape for those who shrink from the intricacies and difficulties of elaborate systems, and to substitute for painstaking analytical classification a simple arrangement that is better...
Page 9 - ... of History, 16 would be History of Civilization and 17, Historical essays and Miscellaneous, while 33 is Ireland, 40 is Italy and 71 is India. A few numbers were left out at the end of each general division to provide for inserting new classes. However, Fletcher advised that additional classes could be inserted at any point by giving them the number of the preceding class with a letter added. The books in each class were supposed to be numbered consecutively. Subdivisions could be made as needed...

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