Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution

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Simon and Schuster, 1996 - Science - 307 pages
176 Reviews

Virtually all serious scientists accept the truth of Darwin's theory of evolution. While the fight for its acceptance has been a long and difficult one, after a century of struggle among the cognoscenti the battle is over. Biologists are now confident that their remaining questions, such as how life on Earth began, or how the Cambrian explosion could have produced so many new species in such a short time, will be found to have Darwinian answers. They, like most of the rest of us, accept Darwin's theory to be true.

But should we? What would happen if we found something that radically challenged the now-accepted wisdom? In Darwin's Black Box, Michael Behe argues that evidence of evolution's limits has been right under our noses -- but it is so small that we have only recently been able to see it. The field of biochemistry, begun when Watson and Crick discovered the double-helical shape of DNA, has unlocked the secrets of the cell. There, biochemists have unexpectedly discovered a world of Lilliputian complexity. As Behe engagingly demonstrates, using the examples of vision, bloodclotting, cellular transport, and more, the biochemical world comprises an arsenal of chemical machines, made up of finely calibrated, interdependent parts. For Darwinian evolution to be true, there must have been a series of mutations, each of which produced its own working machine, that led to the complexity we can now see. The more complex and interdependent each machine's parts are shown to be, the harder it is to envision Darwin's gradualistic paths, Behe surveys the professional science literature and shows that it is completely silent on the subject, stymied by the elegance of the foundation of life. Could it be that there is some greater force at work?

Michael Behe is not a creationist. He believes in the scientific method, and he does not look to religious dogma for answers to these questions. But he argues persuasively that biochemical machines must have been designed -- either by God, or by some other higher intelligence. For decades science has been frustrated, trying to reconcile the astonishing discoveries of modern biochemistry to a nineteenth-century theory that cannot accommodate them. With the publication of Darwin's Black Box, it is time for scientists to allow themselves to consider exciting new possibilities, and for the rest of us to watch closely.

Virtually all serious scientists accept the truth of Darwin's theory of evolution. While the fight for its acceptance has been a long and difficult one, after a century of struggle among the cognoscenti the battle is over. Biologists are now confident that their remaining questions, such as how life on Earth began, or how the Cambrian explosion could have produced so many new species in such a short time, will be found to have Darwinian answers. They, like most of the rest of us, accept Darwin's theory to be true.

But should we? What would happen if we found something that radically challenged the now-accepted wisdom? In Darwin's Black Box, Michael Behe argues that evidence of evolution's limits has been right under our noses -- but it is so small that we have only recently been able to see it. The field of biochemistry, begun when Watson and Crick discovered the double-helical shape of DNA, has unlocked the secrets of the cell. There, biochemists have unexpectedly discovered a world of Lilliputian complexity. As Behe engagingly demonstrates, using the examples of vision, bloodclotting, cellular transport, and more, the biochemical world comprises an arsenal of chemical machines, made up of finely calibrated, interdependent parts. For Darwinian evolution to be true, there must have been a series of mutations, each of which produced its own working machine, that led to the complexity we can now see. The more complex and interdependent each machine's parts are shown to be, the harder it is to envision Darwin's gradualistic paths, Behe surveys the professional science literature and shows that it is completely silent on the subject, stymied by the elegance of the foundation of life. Could it be that there is some greater force at work?

Michael Behe is not a creationist. He believes in the scientific method, and he does not look to religious dogma for answers to these questions. But he argues persuasively that biochemical machines must have been designed -- either by God, or by some other higher intelligence. For decades science has been frustrated, trying to reconcile the astonishing discoveries of modern biochemistry to a nineteenth-century theory that cannot accommodate them. With the publication of Darwin's Black Box, it is time for scientists to allow themselves to consider exciting new possibilities, and for the rest of us to watch closely.

  

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Great insight into the many false claims of Darwin - Goodreads
... very difficult to read. - Goodreads
I don't like his method of argumentation. - Goodreads

Must have for anyone interested in apologetics

User Review  - JJPJ - Christianbook.com

My wife baught this for bme as a birthday gift a few years back and im so glad she did. Many times I have been faced with someone standing on the side of Scientific Naturalism. By using the ... Read full review

Review: Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution

User Review  - Jeffrey Backlin - Goodreads

As a theistic evolutionist, Behe rejects the power of naturalistic evolution. Whether or not his arguments can withstand scrutiny (as developed alone in this work) is questionable, however a good and thought-provoking work. Read full review

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Related books

Contents

Lilliputian Biology
3
Nuts and Bolts
26
Row Row Row Your Boat
51
Rube Goldberg in the Blood
74
From Here to There
98
A Dangerous World
117
Road Kill
140
Publish or Perish
165
Intelligent Design
187
Questions About Design
209
Science Philosophy Religion
232
Copyright

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Darwin's Black Box
However, they are all part of a recent book by Free Press titled, Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution by Michael Behe. ...
www.leaderu.com/ orgs/ probe/ docs/ darwinbx.html

Darwin's Black Box - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution (1996, first edition; 2006, second edition) is a book written by Michael J. Behe and published by ...
en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/ Darwin's_Black_Box

Lehigh University Department of Biological Sciences
Michael J. Behe, Ph.D. Michael J. Behe, Ph.D. Professor Biochemistry. Department of Biological Sciences Iacocca Hall, Room D-221 111 Research Drive ...
www.lehigh.edu/ ~inbios/ faculty/ behe.html

Darwin's Black Box
Darwin's Black Box. It was once expected that the basis of life would be exceedingly simple. That expectation has been smashed. Vision, motion, and other ...
www.ridgenet.net/ ~do_while/ sage/ v1i9f.htm

Truth In Science - Darwin's Black Box - Michael Behe
Sections. Home · News Blog · National Curriculum · GCSE Biology · A-Level Biology · Scotland · Wales/Cymru · Science Lessons · Evidence for Evolution...
www.truthinscience.org.uk/ site/ content/ view/ 137/ 57/

Darwin's Black Box: Irreducible Complexity or Irreproducible ...
Biochemist Michael Behe claims in his book 'Darwin's Black Box' that many biological systems are 'irreducibly complex,' that in order to evolve, ...
www.talkorigins.org/ faqs/ behe/ review.html

Darwin's Black Box by Michael Behe - Selected quotes & page numbers
Darwin's Black Box by Michael Behe - Selected quotes & page. numbers. It was once expected that the basis of life would be exceedingly simple. ...
www.idnet.com.au/ files/ pdf/ Darwin's%20Black%20Box%20Michael%20Behe.PDF

The Archive: Michael J. Behe: A Response to Critics of Darwin's ...
ABSTRACT—In 1996 I published Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution. The main thesis of the book was that science has discovered in the ...
www.iscid.org/ boards/ ubb-get_topic-f-10-t-000010.html

Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution ...
Darwins Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution from Public Interest in News provided free by Find Articles
findarticles.com/ p/ articles/ mi_m0377/ is_n126/ ai_19101774

Virtually all serious scientists accept the truth of Darwin's ...
Virtually all serious scientists accept the truth of Darwin's theory of evolution. While the fight for its acceptance has been a long and difficult one, ...
www.veritas-ucsb.org/ reading/ BeDBB.html

About the author (1996)

Michael J. Behe is Professor of Biochemistry at Lehigh University. He lives in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

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