Mencius

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, Oct 28, 2004 - Philosophy - 246 pages
13 Reviews
Mencius was one of the great philosophers of ancient China, second only in influence to Confucius, whose teachings he defended and expanded. The Mencius, in which he recounts his dialogues with kings, dukes and military men, as well as other philosophers, is one of the Four Books that make up the essential Confucian corpus. It takes up Confucius’s theories of jen, or goodness and yi, righteousness, explaining that the individual can achieve harmony with mankind and the universe by perfecting his innate moral nature and acting with benevolence and justice. Mencius’ strikingly modern views on the duties of subjects and their rulers or the evils of war, created a Confucian orthodoxy that has remained intact since the third century BCE.

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Review: Mencius

User Review  - Benjamin Parry - Goodreads

#Mencius Review "Now is the time when one can, with half the effort, achieve twice as much as the ancients" Mencius is the second of the four books that form the Chinese Confucian canon along with ... Read full review

Review: Mencius

User Review  - William Murakami-brundage - Goodreads

Core of Chinese philosophy, reading Mencius and related works can shed light on the whys and hows of otherwise obtuse rituals and mannerisms found throughout this region's tenets. Read full review

About the author (2004)

D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.
D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.

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