The President

Front Cover
Waveland Press, 1997 - Fiction - 286 pages
33 Reviews
The book portraying both a totalitarian government and its damaging psychological effects. Drawing from his experiences as a journalist writing under repressive conditions, Asturias employs such literary devices as satire to convey the government’s transgressions and surrealistic dream sequences to demonstrate the police state’s impact on the individual psyche.

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Review: The President

User Review  - John Gurney - Goodreads

A wonderful novel about a terrible topic, The President won the Nobel Prize in literature for Miguel Angel Asturias. A Latin American dictator rules through fear and arbitrariness. The most careful ... Read full review

Review: The President

User Review  - Mandy Haggith - Goodreads

A scarily brilliant portrayal of a Latin American dictator's increasingly crazy rule, and the way love can change a yes-man into a man with a moral compass. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
12
Section 3
18
Copyright

37 other sections not shown

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About the author (1997)

Novelist, playwright, poet, translator, and diplomat, Miguel Asturias received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1967 for what was considered highly colored writing rooted in national individuality and Indian tradition. His first novel, El Senor Presidente, a fictional account of the period of violence and human degradation under the Guatemalan dictator Estrada Cabrera, was completed in 1932 but not published until 1946 for political reasons. It was pioneering in its use of surrealistic structures and Indian myth as integrated parts of the novel's structure. Mulata (1963) uses a Guatemalan version of the legend of Faust as a point of departure for Asturias's inventive use of Indian myth. In 1966, Asturias received the Lenin Peace Prize for writings that expose American intervention against the Guatemalan people. Following the 1954 uprising, Asturias was deprived of his citizenship by the new government and lived in exile for eight years. After the election of President Julio Cesar Mendez Montenegro in 1967, he was restored to his country's diplomatic services as ambassador to Paris and continued to publish.

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